Skip to main content

Language: English / GĂ idhlig

Loading…

Chamber and committees

Questions and answers

Parliamentary questions can be asked by any MSP to the Scottish Government or the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body. The questions provide a means for MSPs to get factual and statistical information.

  • Written questions must be answered within 10 working days (20 working days during recess)
  • Other questions such as Topical, Portfolio, General and First Minister's Question Times are taken in the Chamber

Filter your results Hide all filters

Dates of parliamentary sessions
  1. Session 1: 12 May 1999 to 31 March 2003
  2. Session 2: 7 May 2003 to 2 April 2007
  3. Session 3: 9 May 2007 to 22 March 2011
  4. Session 4: 11 May 2011 to 23 March 2016
  5. Session 5: 12 May 2016 to 5 May 2021
  6. Current session: 12 May 2021 to 24 March 2023
Answer status
Question type
Reset filter

Displaying 227 questions Show Answers

|

Question reference: S5O-04017

  • Asked by: Angela Constance, MSP for Almond Valley, Scottish National Party
  • Date lodged: Wednesday, 08 January 2020
  • Current Status: Answered by Christina McKelvie on 16 January 2020

To ask the Scottish Government when it will make a clear commitment and implementation plan to enshrine the right to food in Scots law.

Question reference: S5W-26754

  • Asked by: Angela Constance, MSP for Almond Valley, Scottish National Party
  • Date lodged: Wednesday, 18 December 2019
  • Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 8 January 2020

To ask the Scottish Government how the evidence cited in the 2017 NHS Health Scotland report, Restriction of price promotions, specifically shows that restricting or banning (a) multi-buys, including meal deals, buy one get one free and three for two offers, (b) free products or free samples, (c) the sale of unlimited amounts for a fixed charge, such as unlimited refills, (d) upselling, (e) physical or electronic coupons, (f) purchase rewards, such as toys, vouchers, loyalty card points, reduced price for another product or competition entry, (g) checkout, end-of-aisle, front of store or island/bin displays and (h) the promotion of value, will result in healthier diets.

Question reference: S5W-26756

  • Asked by: Angela Constance, MSP for Almond Valley, Scottish National Party
  • Date lodged: Wednesday, 18 December 2019
  • Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 8 January 2020

To ask the Scottish Government how the evidence cited in the 2018 Food Standards Scotland report, Discretionary Foods, specifically shows that restricting or banning (a) multi-buys, including meal deals, buy one get one free and three for two offers, (b) free products or free samples, (c) the sale of unlimited amounts for a fixed charge, such as unlimited refills, (d) upselling, (e) physical or electronic coupons, (f) purchase rewards, such as toys, vouchers, loyalty card points, reduced price for another product or competition entry, (g) checkout, end-of-aisle, front of store or island/bin displays and (h) the promotion of value, will result in healthier diets.

Question reference: S5W-26750

  • Asked by: Angela Constance, MSP for Almond Valley, Scottish National Party
  • Date lodged: Wednesday, 18 December 2019
  • Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 8 January 2020

To ask the Scottish Government how the evidence cited in Reducing Health Harms of Foods High in Fat, Sugar or Salt: Consultation Paper specifically shows that restricting or banning (a) multi-buys, including meal deals, buy one get one free and three for two offers, (b) free products or free samples, (c) the sale of unlimited amounts for a fixed charge, such as unlimited refills, (d) upselling, (e) physical or electronic coupons, (f) purchase rewards, such as toys, vouchers, loyalty card points, reduced price for another product or competition entry, (g) checkout, end-of-aisle, front of store or island/bin displays and (h) the promotion of value, will result in healthier diets.

Question reference: S5W-26755

  • Asked by: Angela Constance, MSP for Almond Valley, Scottish National Party
  • Date lodged: Wednesday, 18 December 2019
  • Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 8 January 2020

To ask the Scottish Government how the evidence cited in the 2018 Food Standards Scotland report, Monitoring retail purchase and price promotions in Scotland (2010 - 2016), specifically shows that restricting or banning (a) multi-buys, including meal deals, buy one get one free and three for two offers, (b) free products or free samples, (c) the sale of unlimited amounts for a fixed charge, such as unlimited refills, (d) upselling, (e) physical or electronic coupons, (f) purchase rewards, such as toys, vouchers, loyalty card points, reduced price for another product or competition entry, (g) checkout, end-of-aisle, front of store or island/bin displays and (h) the promotion of value, will result in healthier diets.

Question reference: S5W-26760

  • Asked by: Angela Constance, MSP for Almond Valley, Scottish National Party
  • Date lodged: Wednesday, 18 December 2019
  • Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 8 January 2020

To ask the Scottish Government how the evidence cited in the 2018 UK Department of Health and Social Care report, Restricting Promotions of Food and Drink that is High in Fat, Sugar and Salt, specifically shows that restricting or banning (a) multi-buys, including meal deals, buy one get one free and three for two offers, (b) free products or free samples, (c) the sale of unlimited amounts for a fixed charge, such as unlimited refills, (d) upselling, (e) physical or electronic coupons, (f) purchase rewards, such as toys, vouchers, loyalty card points, reduced price for another product or competition entry, (g) checkout, end-of-aisle, front of store or island/bin displays and (h) the promotion of value, will result in healthier diets.

Question reference: S5W-26753

  • Asked by: Angela Constance, MSP for Almond Valley, Scottish National Party
  • Date lodged: Wednesday, 18 December 2019
  • Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 8 January 2020

To ask the Scottish Government how the evidence cited in the 2017 University of Stirling report that was prepared for Food Standards Scotland, Identifying and Understanding the Factors that can Transform the Retail Environment to Enable Healthier Purchasing by Consumers, specifically shows that restricting or banning (a) multi-buys, including meal deals, buy one get one free and three for two offers, (b) free products or free samples, (c) the sale of unlimited amounts for a fixed charge, such as unlimited refills, (d) upselling, (e) physical or electronic coupons, (f) purchase rewards, such as toys, vouchers, loyalty card points, reduced price for another product or competition entry, (g) checkout, end-of-aisle, front of store or island/bin displays and (h) the promotion of value, will result in healthier diets.

Question reference: S5W-26759

  • Asked by: Angela Constance, MSP for Almond Valley, Scottish National Party
  • Date lodged: Wednesday, 18 December 2019
  • Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 8 January 2020

To ask the Scottish Government how the evidence as cited in its 2019 report, Consultation analysis of the Reducing Health Harms of Foods high in Fat, Sugar or Salt, specifically shows that restricting or banning (a) multi-buys, including meal deals, buy one get one free and three for two offers, (b) free products or free samples, (c) the sale of unlimited amounts for a fixed charge, such as unlimited refills, (d) upselling, (e) physical or electronic coupons, (f) purchase rewards, such as toys, vouchers, loyalty card points, reduced price for another product or competition entry, (g) checkout, end-of-aisle, front of store or island/bin displays and (h) the promotion of value, will result in healthier diets.

Question reference: S5W-26758

  • Asked by: Angela Constance, MSP for Almond Valley, Scottish National Party
  • Date lodged: Wednesday, 18 December 2019
  • Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 8 January 2020

To ask the Scottish Government how the evidence cited in the 2019 Food Standards Scotland report, Out of Home Environment in Scotland (June 2015-2018), specifically shows that restricting or banning (a) multi-buys, including meal deals, buy one get one free and three for two offers, (b) free products or free samples, (c) the sale of unlimited amounts for a fixed charge, such as unlimited refills, (d) upselling, (e) physical or electronic coupons, (f) purchase rewards, such as toys, vouchers, loyalty card points, reduced price for another product or competition entry, (g) checkout, end-of-aisle, front of store or island/bin displays and (h) the promotion of value, will result in healthier diets.

Question reference: S5W-26752

  • Asked by: Angela Constance, MSP for Almond Valley, Scottish National Party
  • Date lodged: Wednesday, 18 December 2019
  • Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 8 January 2020

To ask the Scottish Government how the evidence cited in the 2015 Public Health England report, Sugar Reduction: The evidence for action, specifically shows that restricting or banning (a) multi-buys, including meal deals, buy one get one free and three for two offers, (b) free products or free samples, (c) the sale of unlimited amounts for a fixed charge, such as unlimited refills, (d) upselling, (e) physical or electronic coupons, (f) purchase rewards, such as toys, vouchers, loyalty card points, reduced price for another product or competition entry, (g) checkout, end-of-aisle, front of store or island/bin displays and (h) the promotion of value, will result in healthier diets.