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To ask the Scottish Government when it will be in a position to announce the chairs of the independent reviews of the Mental Health (Care and Treatment)(Scotland) Act 2003 and the delivery of forensic mental health services in Scotland, which were announced in March 2019.


Answered by Clare Haughey (20/05/2019):

I am delighted to have secured the services of John Scott QC as Chairperson for the review of the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003. Mr Scott brings extensive experience within the areas of legislation and human rights and will also provide strong leadership in the delivery of an independent, evidence led review.

 

I am also pleased to announce today the appointment of Derek Barron, Director of Care, Erskine as Chairperson for the review into the delivery of forensic mental health services in Scotland. Mr Barron brings to the role of Chair long-standing experience in mental health nursing across a number of NHS Boards. His experience in providing visible, transformational leadership across services will be instrumental in ensuring delivery of this review that will encompass hospitals, prisons, courts, and the community.

 

While it will be for the Chairs to determine how the reviews are best taken forward I have been clear that both reviews will be stakeholder driven and evidence led. We want to gather views from as wide a range of people as possible including the voices of those with lived experience so that they can help shape the future direction of our legislation and the services that are provided to those with mental illness.


Current Status: Initiated by the Scottish Government. Answered by Clare Haughey on 20/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether Revenue Scotland provides external insights into its compliance activity and, if not, whether it will provide details of what oversight is provided to ensure that tax is applied correctly and fairly.


Answered by Kate Forbes (17/05/2019):

To ensure that its decisions are impartial and in line with international best practice, Revenue Scotland operates independently of the Scottish Ministers in its role and is directly accountable to the Scottish Parliament. I have asked the Chief Executive of Revenue Scotland to write to the member on this matter.


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 17/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many (a) residential, (b) non-residential and (c) mixed property owners in each local authority area have paid the Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT) since June 2016.


Answered by Kate Forbes (17/05/2019):

For LBTT purposes, transactions are either residential or non-residential. The numbers of LBTT returns received for residential and non-residential property transactions are published on a monthly basis by Revenue Scotland on its website at: https://www.revenue.scot/about-us/publications/statistics


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 17/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the statement by Revenue Scotland statement that “estimates of gross Additional Dwelling Settlements [are] declared due by local authority,” whether it will provide (a) a breakdown of the responsibility for and (b) th erevenue allocation of Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT) returns.


Answered by Kate Forbes (17/05/2019):

Estimates of the number of additional dwelling transactions and the gross Additional Dwelling Supplement (ADS) revenues due according to the local authority in which the relevant property is located are provided annually by Revenue Scotland in Figures 17 and 18 of their publication, Annual Summary of Trends in the Devolved Taxes (2017-18). The transactions and revenue figures can be found at the following link: https://www.revenue.scot/about-us/publications/statistics .


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 17/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much will be raised by the Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT) in (a) 2019-20 and (b) 2020-21.


Answered by Kate Forbes (17/05/2019):

The latest 5-year revenue forecasts for Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT) covering the period 2019-20 to 2023-24 were published by the Scottish Fiscal Commission on 12 December 2018. A summary of their tax forecasts can be found in Table 9 of Scotland’s Economic and Fiscal Forecasts, December 2018 which is available at: http://www.fiscalcommission.scot/media/1196/scotlands-economic-fiscal-forecasts-publication.pdf .


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 17/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action it has taken to improve the average band D Energy Performance Certificate rating in the residential housing sector.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (17/05/2019):

Energy efficiency has been a long-term priority for the Scottish Government. By the end of 2021, we will have allocated over £1 billion pounds since 2009 on tackling fuel poverty and improving energy efficiency. This year alone we have allocated £145 million to improving the energy efficiency of Scotland’s building stock, and we recently announced a two-year extension, worth an additional
‎ £38 million, to our Warmer Homes Scotland Scheme which helps those on low incomes improve their homes.

Our investment to date has resulted in clear improvements in energy efficiency ratings in the housing sector. Information from the Scottish House Condition Survey about EPC ratings is in the public domain at: https://www.gov.scot/publications/scottish-house-condition-survey-2017-key-findings/pages/5/ . Under SAP 2009 (which allows comparisons over a longer time frame), 46% of dwellings were rated C or better in 2017, up from 24% in 2010. In addition, the number of dwellings rated below band D reduced from 27% in 2010 to 13% in 2017.

In 2015 the Scottish Government designated the energy efficiency of buildings as a National Infrastructure Priority, and Energy Efficient Scotland – a 20-year programme – is the cornerstone of this. The Route Map for Energy Efficient Scotland published in May 2018 sets out our vision that by 2040, all our buildings will be warmer, greener and more efficient. We are also currently consulting on the impact of bringing forward the target date of the long term target for homes from the current date of 2040. The consultation closes on 17 June. We will consider the responses with our partners in local government and where we can move faster whilst supporting a Just Transition to a low carbon economy across Scotland then we will do so.


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 17/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what progress is being made on delivering the A90 upgrade between Perth, Dundee and Aberdeen, including the northern relief road for Dundee.


Answered by Michael Matheson (16/05/2019):

The recent completion of the Aberdeen Western Peripheral Route including the section from Balmedie to Tipperty has delivered a significant upgrade to the A90 trunk road network in the North East. In addition, the design work on improvements to the A90/A937 at Laurencekirk continues to move forward with the next stage, the publication of draft Orders, planned for later in 2019.

The Strategic Transport Review (STPR), published in 2008, recommended a programme of on-going route management for the A90. This included targeted improvements which would contribute towards the need to maintain and safely operate the trunk road network. These localised improvements continue to be delivered through Transport Scotland’s annual maintenance programme.

The second Strategic Transport Projects Review is now well underway and this will allow us to reassess any previously recommended interventions that have not yet been progressed, such as the A90 at Dundee. This will ensure that they remain relevant to delivering the vision and outcomes of the new National Transport Strategy and continue to be the correct decisions for the public purse.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it ensures that all NHS boards follow best practice guidelines regarding breast cancer treatment.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (16/05/2019):

Following the identification of the variation in practice in NHS Tayside, the Northern Cancer Alliance has commissioned an independent review of all Clinical Management Guidelines (CMG) for cancer in the North of Scotland - this is expected to take 12-18 months.

These guidelines will also be benchmarked against existing CMG in the West and South East Cancer Networks to give confidence that consistent guidelines are in place across NHS Scotland and to ensure equity of cancer treatment provision.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-19373 by Jeane Freeman on 8 November 2018, whether it will provide an update on each NHS board's frequency of the use of (a) Oncotype DX and (b) other breast cancer tumour profiling tests.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (16/05/2019):

The Scottish Government does not hold more recent information than contained in the answer to S5W-19373 regarding the frequency of use of Oncotype DX or other breast cancer tumour profiling tests.

Updated information may be held by individual NHS Boards.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of concerns raised by the British Dental Association, what the current waiting time is for children in Glasgow from referral to treatment for teeth extractions under general anaesthetic.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (16/05/2019):

This information is not centrally available.

The national waiting times data mart does hold patient data at specialty level that shows how long patients waited for their appointment and how long patients who are still waiting for their appointment have waited to date. ISD can only determine the waiting times up to the quarter ending 31 December 2018 (the most recently published data) at specialty level within an NHS Board.

Data is not however held at procedure level.

Table 1 provides the median wait (days) for inpatients and day cases who were under the age of 16 years and had received their treatment (completed waits). The specialties included are oral and maxillofacial surgery, oral surgery, orthodontics, paediatric dentistry, community dentistry and restorative dentistry.

Table 1: Median wait (days) for inpatients and day cases who are under the age of 16 years for dental specialties (completed waits) for quarter ending 31 December 2018

Health Board

Median wait (days)

NHS Scotland

65

NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

71

Source: ISD waiting times datamart


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the anticipated points of contact are in the process of requesting a social security redetermination, and whether it will publish a flowchart of these.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

Social Security Scotland (the Agency) currently provide re-determination rights for all appealable benefits under the Social Security Act 2018. Clients can request this either by phone or completion of the re-determination form provided with first determination letters. There are at least four contact points between the client and the agency during this process.

The process is described on the mygov website: https://www.mygov.scot/if-you-do-not-agree-with-a-benefit-decision/ .


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether short-term social security assistance will be made available as soon as a request for a social security redetermination is first communicated to the agency or once the completed redetermination request is submitted in full.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

Section 36 of the Social Security (Scotland) Act 2018 provides that Short-term Assistance will be available once a request for a‎ re-determination or an appeal is made. This is considered to be when the individual has submitted the re-determination or appeal form.

We are currently consulting on our proposals for STA, as part of the consultation on Disability Assistance, to inform the detailed design and operation of how it will operate.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many people have been accredited to act as potential lethal controllers under licence from Scottish Natural Heritage to kill beavers under the Beaver Management Framework, effective from 1 May 2019.


Answered by Roseanna Cunningham (16/05/2019):

139 people have been accredited by Scottish Natural Heritage to act as potential lethal controllers to kill beavers under the Beaver Management Framework, effective from 1 May 2019. However, this does not give them permission to kill beavers without an appropriate licence issued by Scottish Natural Heritage. As is made clear in the Framework, lethal control is the last resort.


Current Status: Answered by Roseanna Cunningham on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what level of detail in respect of each lethal control licence issued under the Beaver Management Framework after 1 May 2019 will be retained in relation to why less severe mitigation measures had not been adopted in each particular site prior to the granting of the lethal control licence, and whether the reason for rejection of non-lethal measures will be in the public domain with appropriate redaction to protect individual identities and locations.


Answered by Roseanna Cunningham (16/05/2019):

Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) discusses all licence applications with the applicant, including the problems being experienced and non-lethal measures. This information is summarised in each case. SNH will publish summary data annually on their website on what has been applied for and licensed, purposes for which licences have been granted, issues being experienced, alternatives considered or employed and actions undertaken.


Current Status: Answered by Roseanna Cunningham on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it has encouraged local authorities to keep a register of people and groups that express an interest in self-build homes and, if so, what response it has received.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (16/05/2019):

At Stage 2 of the Planning (Scotland) Bill, an amendment was passed by the Local Government and Communities Committee which requires local development plans to include a list of sites suitable for self-build projects. The Scottish Government is giving further consideration to any appropriate mechanism to support self-build.


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether its funding is being used to subsidise any HGV training facilities.


Answered by Michael Matheson (16/05/2019):

Heavy Goods Vehicle training facilities across Scotland are run on a commercial basis. The Scottish Government is not subsidising any such establishments.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it will publish the revised code of conduct for property factors.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (16/05/2019):

Scottish Ministers have a duty under the Property Factors (Scotland) Act 2011 (the Act) to prepare, from time to time, a code of conduct setting out minimum standards of practice for registered property factors. The Code was introduced in October 2012 and is currently under review.

The Scottish Government has consulted on proposals to strengthen the Code and sought views on the impact the Act has had on improving the regulation of property factors. The findings of the consultation are published at: https://consult.gov.scot/housing-regeneration-and-welfare/code-of-conduct-for-registered-property-factors/ .

Work to finalise the revised Code will take place over the course of 2019 and will be informed by the consultation responses. Regulations setting out the revised Code and the date they will come into force will be laid in Parliament later this year.


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-19873 by Clare Haughey on 22 November 2018, whether it will provide a breakdown of how the £250 million investment in mental health has been spent, including how much has been allocated to preventative approaches and early intervention.


Answered by Clare Haughey (16/05/2019):

The Programme for Government 2018 committed to invest an additional £250 million to improve mental health over the next five years from April 2019.

It committed to a comprehensive package of measures to improve mental health services for children, young people and adults, and ensure that support for good mental health is embedded across our public services.

The Better Mental Health in Scotland Delivery Plan describes how we will implement these actions under key headings, with a key focus on preventative approaches and early intervention:

  • reforming children and young people’s mental health services;
  • improving specialist services for children and young people and adults;
  • taking a 21st century approach to adult mental health;
  • respecting, protecting and fulfilling rights; and
  • making suicide prevention everybody’s business.

Allocations for this and future years are under consideration.


Current Status: Answered by Clare Haughey on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it is anticipates that the social security programme will require an in-year budget revision and, if so, for what reason.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

Sufficient financial resource has been allocated through the budget process to fund the Social Security programme’s delivery plans. The original estimate for spend in 2019-20 was based on an initial set of assumptions in summer 2018. These were reviewed through the autumn in the Scottish Government’s budget-setting process, and we will continue to refine the programme’s budgetary requirements for the year in line with the refresh of the Programme Business Case supporting Wave 2. If any changes are required this would be actioned through the Spring Budget Revision.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many licences for (a) lethal control and (b) non-lethal mitigation measures were issued under the Beaver Management Framework in advance of conferral of European Protected Status on beavers on 1 May 2019.


Answered by Roseanna Cunningham (16/05/2019):

Scottish Natural Heritage issued 27 licences for the lethal control of beavers and 2 licences for non-lethal mitigation measures under the Beaver Management Framework in advance of conferral of European Protected Status on beavers on 1 May 2019.


Current Status: Answered by Roseanna Cunningham on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-22432 by Maree Todd on 29 April 2019, what effect it expects the charging of low prices for childcare services in council-run settings would have on private, voluntary and independent sector providers that cannot match such prices without making a loss.


Answered by Maree Todd (16/05/2019):

As highlighted in the answer to question S5W-22432, local authorities have discretionary powers to provide early learning and childcare beyond the statutory entitlement under section 1(1C) of the Education (Scotland) Act 1980 and may charge for such provision in terms of section 33(2) of the Standards in Scotland’s Schools etc. Act 2000.

Local authorities are committed to ensuring the highest quality of local services for children and families, and in particular to supporting those from more disadvantaged backgrounds. How resources are used locally to support families – for example by helping parents and carers with the costs of childcare – is a matter for local decision-making in line with local democratic processes.


Current Status: Answered by Maree Todd on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many applications Scottish Natural Heritage has received requesting licences to kill beavers under the Beaver Management Framework, effective from 1 May 2019.


Answered by Roseanna Cunningham (16/05/2019):

Scottish Natural Heritage has received 37 application requests for licences to kill beavers under the Beaver Management Framework, effective from 1 May 2019.


Current Status: Answered by Roseanna Cunningham on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government under what circumstances people with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), who are considered to be high-risk as they might experience airway complications before, during or after a procedure, could be recommended for a bone marrow transplant operation.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (16/05/2019):

Decisions on recommendations for a bone marrow transplant operation are made on a case by case basis by a clinician, following all relevant guidelines and assessment of risk and benefits to the patient.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the recommendation in the report, Tackling Sectarianism in Scotland: review of implementation, that “a baseline study to enable a monitoring framework should be established by agreement with the Scottish Government, the football authorities, Police Scotland and other relevant stakeholders”, whether it will place in the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) a copy of the baseline study, the monitoring framework and the annual outcomes of monitoring and evaluation.


Answered by Humza Yousaf (16/05/2019):

Following discussions with the Scottish FA, SPFL, Police Scotland and other stakeholders, the football authorities agreed to collate data on unacceptable conduct in Scottish football for the first time from the start of season 2017-18.

This data provides a baseline for the ongoing monitoring of unacceptable conduct by the football authorities.

This information is shared with the Scottish Government and Police Scotland in confidence, at the request of the football authorities.


Current Status: Answered by Humza Yousaf on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-15871 by Michael Matheson on 8 May 2018, whether it will provide the equivalent figures for (a) 2017-18 and (b) 2018-19.


Answered by Humza Yousaf (16/05/2019):

The available information is provided in the following table, which has been produced from the Scottish Government’s criminal proceedings database .

Please note: Information for 2018-19 will not be available until publication of the Criminal Proceedings in Scotland, 2018-19 Statistical Bulletin. This is due to be published in December 2019.

The dates of all Scottish Government Official and National Statistics publications are pre-announced, and the up to date list of future publications can be found at: https://www2.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/ForthcomingPubs

People convicted for possession of drugs1, by drug type and main penalty, 2017-18.

  

2017-18

Heroin

Total

1,046

Custody²

99

Community payback order

151

DTTO

26

Fine

484

Other

286

Cocaine

Total

853

Custody²

20

Community payback order

84

DTTO

4

Fine

601

Other³

144

Cannabis

Total

1,096

Custody²

31

Community payback order

110

DTTO

3

Fine

599

Other³

353

Amphetamines

Total

50

Custody²

1

Community payback order

6

Fine

31

Other³

12

Ecstasy

Total

127

Community payback order

10

Fine

88

Other³

29

Other

Total

432

Custody²

27

Community payback order

44

DTTO

4

Fine

225

Other³

132

Total convictions

 

3,604

1. Where main charge.

2. Includes prison, YOI, supervised release order, extended sentence, order for life-long restriction.

3. Includes restriction of liberty order, community service order, probation and other community sentences, supervised attendance order, admonition, court cautions, dog disposals, absolute discharge, no order made, remit to children's hearing, insanity, hospital, guardianship order.

The criminal proceedings database does not include information on whether community payback orders include a drug treatment requirement.


Current Status: Answered by Humza Yousaf on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-20504 by Humza Yousaf on 8 January 2019, whether it will provide the same data for (a) January, (b) February, (c) March and (d) April 2019.


Answered by Humza Yousaf (16/05/2019):

I have asked Colin McConnell, Chief Executive of the Scottish Prison Service (SPS), to respond. His response is as follows:

The following tables provide a breakdown of the average occupancy, design capacity and occupancy rate at each Scottish prison in 2019.

SPS has a responsibility to accommodate those sent to us by the courts. The data shows the occupancy levels of each prison when measured against design capacity. The design capacity and operational capacity of prisons are different and can change for reasons of policy, maintenance and changing operational requirements.

January 2019 (Average Prison Population = 7924)

Prison

Average Occupancy

Design Capacity

Occupancy Rate

Addiewell

701

702

99.89%

Barlinnie

1400

987

141.86%

Cornton Vale

88

114

77.25%

Dumfries

191

176

108.36%

Edinburgh

907

867

104.62%

Glenochil

702

668

105.03%

Grampian

452

552

81.83%

Greenock

224

238

94.24%

Inverness

117

93

126.08%

Kilmarnock

503

501

100.37%

Low Moss

776

784

98.97%

Open Estate

171

284

60.32%

Perth

698

631

110.67%

Polmont

456

758

60.20%

Shotts

537

538

99.90%

February 2019 (Average Prison Population = 7999)

Prison

Average Occupancy

Design Capacity

Occupancy Rate

Addiewell

699

702

99.61%

Barlinnie

1435

987

145.42%

Cornton Vale

86

114

75.09%

Dumfries

190

176

108.04%

Edinburgh

918

867

105.91%

Glenochil

727

668

108.84%

Grampian

459

552

83.20%

Greenock

218

238

91.48%

Inverness

123

93

132.26%

Kilmarnock

501

501

100.09%

Low Moss

776

784

99.04%

Open Estate

175

284

61.58%

Perth

701

631

111.07%

Polmont

458

758

60.47%

Shotts

532

538

98.80%

March 2019 (Average Prison Population = 8101)

Name

Average Occupancy

Design Capacity

Occupancy Rate

Addiewell

701

702

99.88%

Barlinnie

1441

987

146.01%

Cornton Vale

95

114

83.64%

Dumfries

191

176

108.67%

Edinburgh

918

867

105.85%

Glenochil

738

668

110.53%

Grampian

462

552

83.66%

Greenock

214

238

89.78%

Inverness

121

93

129.90%

Kilmarnock

538

501

107.33%

Low Moss

781

784

99.66%

Open Estate

183

284

64.57%

Perth

709

631

112.36%

Polmont

470

758

62.07%

Shotts

538

538

99.91%

April 2019 (Average Prison Population to 26 April 2019 = 8186)

Name

Average Occupancy

Design Capacity

Occupancy Rate

Addiewell

700

702

99.72%

Barlinnie

1449

987

146.79%

Cornton Vale

97

114

84.74%

Dumfries

194

176

110.45%

Edinburgh

920

867

106.17%

Glenochil

737

668

110.28%

Grampian

451

552

81.70%

Greenock

215

238

90.43%

Inverness

124

93

133.38%

Kilmarnock

593

501

118.46%

Low Moss

782

784

99.78%

Open Estate

194

284

68.48%

Perth

705

631

111.75%

Polmont

480

758

63.38%

Shotts

538

538

100.01%


Current Status: Answered by Humza Yousaf on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it has implemented the recommendations in the report, Tackling Sectarianism in Scotland: review of implementation, and whether it will provide a progress report on each recommendation.


Answered by Humza Yousaf (16/05/2019):

Professor Morrow’s review itself provided an excellent independent evaluation of the progress that the Scottish Government and its partners have made in implementing the recommendations from the Advisory Group’s report – and, as such, the Scottish Government currently has no plans to publish a further evaluation.

The review highlighted the progress that has been made particularly in areas such as education, training and the mainstreaming of anti-sectarian messages. The review – which remains live and continues to form the basis of our work on this issue - also emphasised that more is still to be done to tackle sectarianism by a range of organisations, institutions and sectors across Scotland.


Current Status: Answered by Humza Yousaf on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on whether the recommendations in the report, Tackling Sectarianism in Scotland: review of implementation, should have led to Police Scotland making sectarian a mandatory marker for crime reporting and recording.


Answered by Humza Yousaf (16/05/2019):

Professor Morrow’s report recommended that a review of hate crime legislation should consider how sectarianism and sectarian incidents could be integrated into a more general approach.

Following the Justice Committee’s recommendation, in January 2018, that a definition of sectarianism in Scot’s law should be considered, a working group was set up. The group reported in November 2018 and concluded that a sectarian statutory aggravation should be introduced along with a definition in Scots law. The group’s conclusions were included for all interested parties and individuals to comment within the hate Crime consultation, which closed in February 2019.

No decisions on establishing a statutory aggravation for sectarianism will be taken until the consultation submissions are fully analysed and considered.


Current Status: Answered by Humza Yousaf on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what management information regarding carer's allowance it has requested from the DWP, under its agency agreement, broken down by type of information.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23045 on 16 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its response is to the most recent Scottish Welfare Fund statistics update, which states that Community Care Grant applications from families facing exceptional pressure have increased by 12% since the same quarter last year.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

The Scottish Government has committed to maintaining funding at £38 million (£33 million programme spend and £5 million administration costs) for 2019-20 to help those most in need.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-22530 by Jeane Freeman on 24 April 2019, by what date it will publish the findings of the research into the new clinical decision support system.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (16/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23060 on 15 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of the most recent Scottish Welfare Fund statistics update, for what reason there has been an 85% increase in Crisis Grant applications in Angus compared with the same quarter last year.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

Local trends in Scottish Welfare Fund applications can have a wide range of causes. The latest data for Angus shows the reason for application that has shown the highest recorded increase in this period is “unexpected expense and benefit/income spent”.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it plans to review reserved disability benefit (a) regulations, (b) guidance and (c) case law as part of its work to formulate disability assistance rules, and who will be involved in the review process.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

The Scottish Government will continue to review relevant reserved disability benefit regulations, guidance and case law in formulating Disability Assistance. This will continue to involve relevant officials and, where appropriate, external stakeholders.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it will limit the use of guidance as the basis for processing and determining applications and redeterminations of disability assistance.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23033 on 16 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on whether, in the context of mental health, the definition of "people with lived experience" should include informal carers who support relatives who receive non-consensual  treatment.


Answered by Clare Haughey (16/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to recent question S5W-23053 on 16 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at:http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Clare Haughey on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on whether the short-life working group that will support the review of mental health and incapacity legislation should have at least one person with (a) lived experience who is opposed to the non-consensual treatment of adults, including mental health patients and adults with incapacity and (b) expertise in human rights.


Answered by Clare Haughey (16/05/2019):

The review will be stakeholder-driven and evidence-led and it is crucial that people, particularly those with lived experience, have an opportunity to make their views known.

This Government is determined to ensure that the views of patients, those with lived experience and those that care for them are front and centre of the work to be taken forward so that they can help shape the future direction of our legislation.

How the review is undertaken is a matter for the Chair, but the views of people with lived experience of compulsory care and treatment and their families and representatives must be central to the work of the review.


Current Status: Answered by Clare Haughey on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it will ensure that the chair of the committee that will review mental health and incapacity legislation will give due consideration to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and judgments of the European Court of Human Rights.


Answered by Clare Haughey (16/05/2019):

While it will be for the Chair to determine how the review is best taken forward, we have been clear that the principal aim of the review of the Mental Health Act is to improve the rights and protections of people with a mental disorder and remove barriers to those caring for their health and welfare.

In order for this to happen, the review will need to consider and take account of the developments in mental health law and practice on compulsory detention and care and treatment since the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 came into force.

From that work, we expect recommendations that give effect to the rights, will and preferences of the individual by ensuring that mental health, incapacity and adult support and protection legislation reflects people’s social, economic and cultural rights, including UNCRPD and ECHR requirements.


Current Status: Answered by Clare Haughey on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what impact the reported decline in catches of salmon and sea trout is having on the (a) economic value of wild fisheries and (b) economy in rural areas.


Answered by Roseanna Cunningham (16/05/2019):

The Scottish Government has not undertaken any new assessment of the impact of the most recent salmon and sea trout catch statistics. Our most recent assessment comes from a report by economic consultants PACEC, commissioned in 2015 and published in March 2017. This can be found at https://www2.gov.scot/Resource/0051/00514801.pdf .

Separately, Scottish Enterprise is currently leading a study with the Tweed, Spey, Tay and Dee rivers to look at both the impact of the decline in salmon numbers and the opportunities that there might be to develop the total fishing offer for the future. I understand this work is progressing well and look forward to seeing the outcomes later in the summer.


Current Status: Answered by Roseanna Cunningham on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what volume of human waste has been flushed on to railway tracks from trains in each of the last 10 years.


Answered by Michael Matheson (16/05/2019):

This information is not held by the Scottish Government. Network Rail owns and operates the rail infrastructure in Scotland.

The Scottish Government has directly funded previous installation programmes of Controlled Emission Tanks and is working with ScotRail to eradicate this practice across ScotRail fleets as quickly as possible.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it will incorporate reserved case law on disability benefits into regulation and guidance.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

The Scottish Government will review relevant reserved disability benefit regulations, guidance and case law in formulating Disability Assistance regulations and guidance.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether the primary focus for the (a) conditions of entitlement, (b) definition of terms and (c) processes for determining entitlement for disability assistance will be in regulations or guidance for disability assistance.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

The Scottish Government will consider the appropriate balance between guidance and regulations in setting out the rules relating to entitlement, definitions of terms and processes.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what information it has regarding how many (a) complaints, (b) compliments and (c) suggestions have been received by Social Security Scotland, broken down by the main themes of this feedback.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

The number of complaints, compliments and suggestions including the main themes, received by Social Security Scotland up until the period 31 March 2019 will be published as part of the Social Security Scotland Performance statistics to be published on 17 June 2019 and pre-announced at: https://www2.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/ForthcomingPubs .


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will list the reserved case law on disability benefits that it considers relevant to disability assistance as currently proposed.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23032 on 16 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-22666 by Michael Matheson on 7 May 2019, which set out the rail sector's contribution to the economy, what estimate it has made of this contribution if trains ran on time.


Answered by Michael Matheson (16/05/2019):

The previous report referred to in question S5W-22666 estimated the economic contribution of rail in Scotland in 2016. The Scottish Government has continued its significant investment programme for Scotland’s Railways. This has seen the introduction of new infrastructure, increased new and electric trains delivering more services and more seats for passengers. This programme of investment will continue, and a subsequent review of the economic benefits realised through these initiatives will be scheduled, at a time yet to be determined. Any future report’s will take into account all relevant factors which contribute to the running of the railway.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what analysis of reserved disability benefit (a) legislation, (b) regulations, (c) guidance and (d) case law Parliamentary Counsel has conducted for the purposes of incorporating those rules into Scots law.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

Legislative provision for disability benefits being devolved to Scotland will be detailed in secondary legislation. The drafting of which will take account of all relevant legislation, regulations, guidance and case law.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the (a) total and (b) average cost was of processing Best Start Grant applications in the initial phase up to 28 February 2019, and how this compared with its estimated forecast.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

During 2018-19 Social Security Scotland ensured the delivery of Carer’s Allowance, Carer’s Allowance Supplement and the Pregnancy and Baby Payment element of the Best Start Grant. Social Security Scotland was also working towards delivery of future benefits.

Social Security Scotland does not separate expenditure by benefit as many of the resources employed in delivery of benefits are shared and indivisible.

The spring revision to the Scottish Budget 2018-19 set Social Security Scotland’s running cost budget for the first seven months of operation at £16 million. The Agency’s 2018-19 outturn against budget will be confirmed through Social Security Scotland’s first Annual Report and Accounts, which will be subject to audit by Audit Scotland and are expected to be laid before Parliament in September 2019.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what SEPA has done to eliminate a kerosene leak contaminating a burn near Kirkton Industrial Estate in Arbroath.


Answered by Roseanna Cunningham (16/05/2019):

SEPA has investigated and mitigated the oil pollution event working with Scottish Water and Angus Council, but was unable to locate its source. SEPA determined there was no impact on watercourse ecology from the oil spill.


Current Status: Answered by Roseanna Cunningham on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position on whether the review into mental health and incapacity legislation should take account of the methodology and the findings of earlier research into the views of service users with experience of receiving non-consensual treatment.


Answered by Clare Haughey (16/05/2019):

The vast majority of people who access mental health care and treatment do so on a voluntarily basis. Very few people are ever treated against their will; when they are, it is because it is necessary to protect them or to protect other people.

While it will be for the Chair to determine how the review is best taken forward, we have been clear that the principal aim of the review of the Mental Health Act is to improve the rights and protections of people with a mental disorder and remove barriers to those caring for their health and welfare.

The review will take a human rights approach and will be stakeholder-driven and evidence-led. How the evidence is gathered will again be a matter for the Chair; however, we would expect this comprehensive review to have examined and analysed relevant literature before considering its final recommendations. It is also crucial that people have an opportunity to make their views known, particularly those with lived experience.


Current Status: Answered by Clare Haughey on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether entitlement for short-term assistance will exist for the period immediately after a new social security determination is made and up to the request for a redetermination or an appeal is made, and, if entitlement will exist for this period, whether the assistance will only be made available or payable after the request for a redetermination or an appeal is made.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

Section 36 of the Social Security (Scotland) Act 2018 provides that Short-term Assistance will be available once a request for a re-determination or an appeal is made. In line with a rights based approach, Short-term Assistance will only be made available once the agency knows the individual wishes to receive it.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will request from the DWP, under its agency agreement, how many people who had entitlement to carer's allowance have sought an appeal of a decision to (a) supersede, (b) suspend or (c) terminate that entitlement as a result of them (i) entering full-time education, (ii) earning or having an income greater than the earnings limit or (iii) no longer caring for 35 hours per week and being unsuccessful at mandatory reconsideration, broken down by the (A) year the decision was made and (B) outcome of that appeal.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23045 on 16 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much asbestos is present in (a) schools and (b) educational establishments in each local authority area.


Answered by John Swinney (16/05/2019):

This information is not held centrally.

Health and safety legislation is not devolved to the Scottish Government. However, we take the issue of the handling of asbestos within schools and educational establishments very seriously and expect those with responsibility for those facilities to strictly follow Health and Safety Executive recommendations.


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will request from the DWP, under its agency agreement, how many people with carer's allowance entitlement have had that entitlement (a) superseded, (b) suspended or (c) terminated as a result of them (i) entering full-time education, (ii) earning or having an income greater than the earnings limit or (iii) no longer caring for 35 hours per week, broken down by the year the decision was made.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23045 on 16 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its response is to the call by the NASUWT for asbestos to be eradicated completely from all educational establishments.


Answered by John Swinney (16/05/2019):

Health and safety legislation is not devolved to the Scottish Government. However, we take the issue of the handling of asbestos within educational establishments very seriously and expect those with responsibility for those facilities to strictly follow Health and Safety Executive recommendations.


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government which rails stations it plans to make fully accessible for disabled people in the next year.


Answered by Michael Matheson (16/05/2019):

Rail Accessibility is a UK Government reserved matter and therefore responsibility for making stations accessible rests with them.

We plan to make nine stations step-free in Control Period 6 (CP6), 2019 to 2024, as follows:

  • Six stations will be funded by the Department for Transport’s Access for All Programme:- Anniesland, Croy, Dumfries, Johnstone, Port Glasgow and Uddingston.
  • Three stations will be funded by the Scottish Government:- Aviemore, Nairn and Pitlochry.

This Scottish Government is also considering proposals for funding further stations.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will request from the DWP, under its agency agreement, how many people who had entitlement to carer's allowance have sought a mandatory reconsideration of a decision to (a) supersede, (b) suspend or (c) terminate that entitlement as a result of them (i) entering full-time education, (ii) earning or having an income greater than the earnings limit and (iii) no longer caring for 35 hours per week, broken down by the (A) year the decision was made and (B) outcome of that mandatory reconsideration.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23045 on 16 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how frequently it has requested management information regarding carer's allowance from the DWP, under its agency agreement, broken down by the type of information.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

The Scottish Government receives management information from the DWP under the terms of the Agency Agreement. The relevant section of the agency agreement can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/carers-allowance-in-scotland-agency-agreement-and-service-level-agreement/carers-allowance-in-scotland-agency-agreement#management-information


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its response is to the most recent Scottish Welfare Fund statistics update, which states that Community Care Grant applications have increased by 20% or more in nine local authorities.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (16/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-23027 on 16 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx ”.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what progress it is making towards the commitments contained in Scotland’s Energy Strategy, which was published in December 2017.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (16/05/2019):

Yesterday the Scottish Government published three important documents – setting out our progress since publishing Scotland’s Energy Strategy, the actions that we have taken and those which we will be focusing on during the coming months. These included the publication on 15 May 2019 of the Annual Energy Statement 2019, which will be the first in a series of annual publications, alongside our Annual Compendium of Scottish Energy Statistics. These are to be found at: https://www.gov.scot/publications/annual-energy-statement-2019/

In parallel, on the same date, we also published our “Energy Consumer Action Plan: Putting Consumers at The Heart of Scotland’s Energy Transition”. The action plan – backed by £500,000 of Scottish Government funding – sets out actions to increase consumer understanding and confidence, and develop and test innovative approaches to protecting and empowering consumers. This includes a commitment to establish an independent Energy Consumers Commission for Scotland to give consumers in Scotland a more powerful voice in Scottish and GB energy policy. The action plan can be viewed at:

https://www.gov.scot/publications/energy-consumer-action-plan-putting-consumers-heart-scotlands-energy-transition/

Together, these documents represent an authoritative summary of Scotland’s energy policy and progress – as well as demonstrating clear action on our part to prioritise the role, involvement and interests of consumers as we continue to decarbonise the whole energy system in order to help tackle the climate emergency. In short, they underline our commitment to ensuring that the people of Scotland benefit from the transition to a carbon neutral economy.


Current Status: Initiated by the Scottish Government. Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many pregnant women have had a “home” abortion since its decision to allow misoprostol to be self-administered at home, and whether it will publish copy of its risk assessment and equality impact assessment documentation.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (16/05/2019):

Information Services Division (ISD) within NHS National Services Scotland collects data on abortions in Scotland. Data for 2018 will be published by ISD at the end of May 2019. By the end of 2017, there were 58 medical terminations of pregnancy recorded as early medical abortions at home.

Misoprostol is a licenced drug, used for a number of purposes, including treatment of miscarriage and as part of abortion treatment. Its use in medical abortion is recommended by a wide range of expert bodies, including the World Health Organization and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

The Scottish Ministers’ approval of October 2017 does not relate to self-administration of misoprostol as it only relates to permitting a woman’s home as a class of place where misoprostol can be taken as part of treatment for termination of pregnancy. Most patients already chose to self-administer misoprostol tablets prior to the approval.

Before issuing the approval, Ministers were satisfied, on the basis of advice from clinical specialists, that there was no increased risk to patients from home administration of misoprostol and that the change would be a beneficial one for those women who chose the option of taking misoprostol at home. There is no evidence that misoprostol leads to any increased risks to either the physical or mental health of the patient compared to other forms of abortion treatment.

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and NHS Lothian are undertaking research on women’s experiences of taking misoprostol at home and the effectiveness of early medical abortion at home. This research will be published in due course.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many (a) first, (b) second and (c) third IVF cycles have been delivered in each year since 2007.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (16/05/2019):

IVF Waiting Times data are collected for first cycle to screening appointment. "Information Services Division collect IVF data to inform the target for NHSScotland; that eligible patients will commence IVF treatment within 12 months by 31 March 2015." Data from July 2014 can be found at www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Waiting-Times/IVF-Waiting-Times/ .


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 16/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what information it can provide regarding the Minister for Parliamentary Business and Veteran’s recent visit to North America.


Answered by Fiona Hyslop (15/05/2019):

The Minister travelled to New York for engagements between 4 to 7 April 2019. The programme focussed on engagement with New York diaspora groups for Scotland Week, as well as promotion of Scottish culture, trade & investment, tourism, higher education and food and drink. In addition, the Minister’s presence highlighted the importance of the Declaration of Arbroath and the links between Scotland and the US Founding Fathers, ahead of the 700 th Anniversary next year in his constituency.

The relationship between Scotland and the US is extremely important, reflected by strong economic, cultural and policy links. The US is Scotland’s top export partner with Scottish exports to the US estimated to be worth £5.545 billion in 2017 (17.1% of all international exports).

NeueHouse, on East 25 th Street, acted as a ‘pop-up Scotland House’ venue for a number of engagements at Scotland Week this year, a partnership between the Scottish Government, Visit Scotland and Scottish Development International (SDI) with each having the opportunity to host events for the key stakeholder groups.

On 4 April, at NeueHouse, the Minister attended the annual SDI Stakeholder Reception where he spoke to an audience of businesses with key interests in Scotland.

On 5 April the Minister addressed approximately 50 key members of the diaspora in the New York area including: the St Andrews Society of the State of New York; the American Scottish Foundation; the New York Caledonian Club and the New York Tartan Day Committee.

Minister Dey then met with SALT Hotels, CEO, David Bowd. They discussed SDI’s intentions to continue to work with the company as they continue to focus on hotel development in Edinburgh.

The Minister attended the American Scottish Foundation’s Tartan Day Observance at Bryant Park. The Minister spoke at the gathering of the importance of the shared links between Scotland and the US, in particular highlighting the upcoming 700 th anniversary of the Declaration of Arbroath and its links to the US. He thanked the organisers and Pipe Bands for participating.

 

The Minister also undertook a business meeting with the ID Co, CCO, Milko Radotic, where it was agreed that the company would collaborate with SDI in building networks and exploring growth opportunities in the US market

The Scottish Affairs Office hosted their annual Alumni Reception. The Minister took the opportunity to engage with alumni of Scottish universities and thank them for continuing to celebrate and champion Scottish educational links.

To end the days’ engagements the Minister attended the NYC Tartan Day Parade Committee’s annual Ceilidh which was attended by approx. 500 guests, including key members of the diaspora community.

On Saturday 6 April to mark the start of Tartan Day, Minister Dey delivered a reading at the St Andrews Society Kirkin o’ the Tartan ceremony at The Brick Presbyterian Church of the City of New York alongside fellow Parliamentary colleagues.

The Minister then had the opportunity to meet with some Veterans who volunteer to support the parade, including Alan Bain, who founded the first Tartan Day parade in New York in 1998. Dan McSweeney, from the Tartan Day committee, welcomed Mr Dey and introduced him to former servicemen and women in the US Armed Forces. The Minister thanked the veterans for their voluntary support of Scotland and discussed veterans’ issues with them.

Following this the Minister and representatives of the Scottish Government, Visit Scotland and Scottish Development International participated in the Tartan Day Parade. The Parade was led this year by Grand Marshall, Sir Billy Connolly.

On the final day of this programme Minister Dey visited Ellis Island to mark Scotland Week activity taking place there. He had the opportunity to witness some highland dancing and Scottish Music before having a guided tour of the Scottish Exhibit on display which highlights the impact of Scots on early America through to the modern day.


Current Status: Initiated by the Scottish Government. Answered by Fiona Hyslop on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many Best Start Grant applications in the initial phase up to 28 February 2019 were from people with non-Scottish postcodes; what proportion of these were processed; for what reason they were processed, and how many staffing hours were spent carrying out this task.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (15/05/2019):

Official statistics on the number of Best Start Grant applications received from people with non-Scottish postcodes to 28 February 2019, and the number of these applications that were processed, are available at: https://www2.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Social-Welfare/SocialSecurityforScotland/BSGFeb2019 . All applications received by Social Security Scotland are processed, to determine whether they will be authorised or denied. We do not hold information on the number of staffing hours spent processing applications with non-Scottish postcodes.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will publish the evaluation of the new clinical decision support system that it commissioned Dr Kathrin Cresswell of the University of Edinburgh to review.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (15/05/2019):

In line with the previous response given in question S5W-22530 on 24 April 2019., the Scottish Government commissioned the Digital Health and Care Institute (DHI) to lead on this work. It was the DHI that commissioned the University of Edinburgh to conduct this research and they have advised that it will be published on the DHI website by the end of this month (May 2019).

All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on whether there is a link between excessive sugar consumption and the increase in the number of autistic people.


Answered by Clare Haughey (15/05/2019):

There is no body of scientific evidence to support the hypothesis that there is a link between excessive sugar consumption and the increase in the number of autistic people.


Current Status: Answered by Clare Haughey on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what research it plans to undertake into the reasons for the rise in the number of autistic people.


Answered by Clare Haughey (15/05/2019):

The Scottish Government is committed to improving the lives of autistic people, their families and carers through the Scottish Strategy for Autism .

There are no current plans to undertake further research into the number of autistic people in Scotland. The Micro segmentation Project published in March 2018 has established a robust national Scottish autism prevalence rate of 1.035%. More information can be found at: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2018/03/3640 .

The Scottish Government have recommended that this prevalence figure should be used as the most accurate prevalence estimate available. The report provides accurate data for the number of autistic individuals, together with numbers with and without an intellectual disability, in every age range for the whole of Scotland and for every Council or Health Board area.


Current Status: Answered by Clare Haughey on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many miles of segregated cycle paths have been constructed in each year since 2010.


Answered by Michael Matheson (15/05/2019):

Since 2010, and with Scottish Government investment, we have worked in partnership with local authorities, Sustrans, Scottish Canals, the National Parks and other delivery bodies to build a total of 340 miles of segregated cycle paths. The figures below include all National Cycle Network (NCN) and non-NCN segregated paths.

Year

2010-
11

2011-
12

2012-
13

2013-
14

2014-
15

2015-
16

2016-
17

2017-
18

Total

          

Miles

4

2

25

34

34

118

72

51

340



Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-21528 by Humza Yousaf on 1 March 2019, what discussions it has had with the chief constable regarding the findings in DCC Taylor's report, and whether it will publish the outcome of these (a) discussions and (b) findings.


Answered by Ash Denham (15/05/2019):

The Scottish Government has not had any discussions with the Chief Constable regarding the content of DCC Taylor’s report. The investigation the report relates to will be for the Scottish Police Authority to take forward.


Current Status: Answered by Ash Denham on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what information it has regarding the combined spend on fisheries, including per registered fishing vessel, agriculture and forestry per CAP payment recipient for (a) Scotland, (b) England and (c) Wales.


Answered by Fergus Ewing (15/05/2019):

The combined spend to date in Scotland under the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) and the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) for the period 2014 to 2020 is £2.2 billion. Information about expenditure on fisheries, agriculture and forestry in England and Wales can be found on the relevant UK Government and Welsh Government websites www.gov.uk and www.gov.wales/ Specific questions about the detailed profile of their expenditure would be best directed to the government departments concerned.


Current Status: Answered by Fergus Ewing on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what standard procedures are in place for the transportation of patient blood samples from GP surgeries to laboratories for analysis of the results in the parts of Scotland covered by the NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde health board and across Scotland.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (15/05/2019):

All blood sample deliveries from GP’s to laboratories in NHSGGC are bound by the regulations set out in the NHSGGC Transport and Disposal of Specimen Containers and Specimens Policy (Oct 2016) and the Transport of Specimens management manual and guidance. In addition to this all laboratories in NHS GGC are accredited under ISO15189:2012 and as such are required to comply with section 5.4.5.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what safeguards have been put in place to prevent poor storage of patient blood samples occurring when this is being transported from GP surgeries to laboratories for analysis of the results in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and across Scotland.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (15/05/2019):

In order to fulfil the ISO standard, each accredited laboratory within NHSGGC will have local policies detailing the steps the individual labs take to monitor the integrity of samples as they arrive in the lab e.g. local transport and acceptance and rejection policies, use of haemolytic indices, delayed sample comments and other safeguards against transport/ storage conditions impacting patient results.

If the specific conditions required for the examination requested are not met then the policies will detail what remedial steps are taken to ensure patients do not receive inappropriate results. For example if a blood sample is received in South Biochemistry and is more than 12 hours old, the potassium result will be removed.

The local specimen transport policies will also detail how the laboratory audits sample transport from source in order to fulfil standard 5.4.5 as above.

The NHSGGC sample transport policy and guidance along with the individual laboratories transport monitoring and acceptance and rejection policies exist so the laboratories, their regulators and the users can be assured that all blood samples taken in GP surgeries in NHS GGC are delivered, received and tested within a time frame and temperature appropriate to the examinations requested.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action it is taking to decrease the prison population and address concerns regarding the (a) safety of prison staff and prisoners and (b) delivery of rehabilitation training, arising from prison overcrowding.


Answered by Ash Denham (15/05/2019):

The Scottish Government has been working closely with the Scottish Prison Service (SPS) and other Justice partners both to ensure the effective management of the increasing prison population and to consider medium and longer term action to reduce the prison population.

A Prisons Resilience Leadership Group of senior officials from relevant justice agencies is being established to ensure a coordinated response to the immediate challenges of the growth in prison numbers.

The Scottish Government remains committed to taking forward action that will aim to address the underlying causes of an increasing prison population, including reducing the use of short periods of custody. On 16 May, we will introduce secondary legislation to extend the current presumption against short sentences from 3 to 12 months.

We recognise the importance of providing a safe and secure environment for all those in custody as well as for the staff who work in our prisons. The SPS has introduced a national Strategic Risk and Threat Group (STRATG) to oversee the response to and mitigate against the risk of violence against SPS staff.

As set out in the SPS Corporate Plan 2019-2022, SPS continuously reviews all learning and development and opportunities for its workforce.


Current Status: Answered by Ash Denham on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether the revised total project cost of £80.5 million for HMP Highland is under review, in light of the operational date being pushed back from October 2021 to March 2023, and when specific funding provision will be confirmed.


Answered by Ash Denham (15/05/2019):

I have asked Colin McConnell, Chief Executive of the Scottish Prison Service (SPS), to respond. His response is as follows:

The costs for the construction of HMP Highland will have to be reviewed to take account of the new provisional operational date following the publication of the Scottish Government's Infrastructure Investment Plan's project pipeline update.

The Scottish Government and the Scottish Prison Service are committed to modernising and improving the prison estate. However, as with all substantial capital projects, the timescale for HMP Highland is dependent on sufficient capital funding being available.


Current Status: Answered by Ash Denham on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of reported previous underestimates, how it has adapted its modelling of the levels of anticipated rail passenger demand for new lines and stations, and whether this will be taken account of in the case of Levenmouth rail link.


Answered by Michael Matheson (15/05/2019):

The SRM12 is maintained and enhanced periodically in line with industry guidance, standards and best practice so that it remains fit for purpose in supporting robust modelling and appraisal of transport interventions across Scotland. As part of the Levenmouth Sustainable Transport Study, the SRM has been enhanced so that it appropriately reflects current conditions in and around the sphere of influence of the Levenmouth area, helping to produce realistic and plausible forecasts of travel demand by road and public transport. A number of sensitivity tests will be conducted to consider other ‘what if’ scenarios to determine the robustness of the appraisal impacts of the multi-modal transport options being considered, including a rail link to Leven.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the (a) total cost and (b) annual interest rates will be in relation to the land purchase for HMP Highland, and whether there are any restrictions placed on the land by the seller and agreed to by the purchaser.


Answered by Ash Denham (15/05/2019):

I have asked Colin McConnell, Chief Executive of the Scottish Prison Service (SPS), to respond. His response is as follows:

The total cost of the land purchase for HMP Highland was £4,749,000 (inclusive of VAT). There are no annual interest rates or restrictions associated with the land.


Current Status: Answered by Ash Denham on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action it is taking to boost the digital skills that will required for businesses in the forthcoming years.


Answered by Kate Forbes (15/05/2019):

This is a critically important time for Scotland’s skills system. We know the nature of work is changing, as is the make-up of Scotland’s workforce, and our labour market faces potential disruption through a range of factors, including Brexit and technological advances.

We want to harness the opportunities this disruption will create, whilst ensuring we have the right skills in place to support individuals, employers and our economy and support governments overarching strategic ambitions of improving productivity and Inclusive Growth.

Digital skills development remains a key priority for the Scottish Government. In addition to the extensive training offered to individuals through our school, college and university systems and apprenticeship programme, we also offer additional support to business through CodeClan, DigitalBoost and the Digital Development Loan.

We continue to support Skills Development Scotland with funding to tackle tongoing sectoral challenges as set out in the Digital Skills Investment Plan, including attracting more women into the sector and increasing the number and variety of apprenticeships available.

Finally, our 2018 Programme for Government includes a commitment to develop a Future Skills Action Plan in 2019, and to establish a National Retraining Partnership.


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will provide a breakdown of how the £5 million that it allocated to the Children and Young People’s Mental Health Task Force in June 2018 has been spent, including how much was allocated to specialist child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS).


Answered by Clare Haughey (15/05/2019):

In December 2018 the Minister for Mental Health, Clare Haughey, announced that £4 million of investment would be distributed through NHS Education for Scotland (NES), to recruit additional CAMHS staff across Scotland who would be instrumental in reducing pressure on the existing system.

The remainder of the funding, also be distributed through NES, will provide additional local training, coaching and supervision of existing CAHMS staff, and an amount of funding will also be made available to enhance the number of places available to study on the MSc in Applied Psychology for Children and Young People course.

Allocations to NES over the lifetime of the Taskforce

Funding has been allocated as detailed in the following table:

 

2018-19*

2019-20

2020-21

CAMHS resource

£457,994

£3,980,179

£3,980,179

Training

£0

£333,388

£310,055

APCYP Trainees

£102,790

£668,673

£887,973

Total per Year

£560,784

£4,982,240

£5,178,207

 


Current Status: Answered by Clare Haughey on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-22768 by Clare Haughey on 2 May 2019, how much of the £1.4 million provided for combat stress is spent in the NHS Grampian area.


Answered by Clare Haughey (15/05/2019):

The majority of funding to Combat Stress is used to provide a national residential facility for veterans at Hollybush House, Ayrshire.

As a national service, veterans living in different parts of Scotland including those within the Grampian area, can be referred to Hollybush House as appropriate.

Combat Stress currently has 434 veterans listed for their services in Scotland with 30 of those residing in the Grampian region (Aberdeen and Moray).


Current Status: Answered by Clare Haughey on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the status is of each section of the (a) A9 and (b) A96 dualling programme, also broken down by how much has been spent each year, and what the budget is for (i) 2019-20 and (ii) future years.


Answered by Michael Matheson (15/05/2019):

The current status of each section of the A9 and A96 Dualling programmes can be found in the following tables.

A9 Dualling Perth to Inverness:

Scheme

Status

A9 Dualling Luncarty to Pass of Birnam

Under construction – expected to be operational spring 2021.

A9 Dualling Pass of Birnam to Tay Crossing

In Preparation – option assessment work on-going with a preferred route option expected to be announced later this year.

A9 Dualling Tay Crossing to Ballinluig

In Preparation – statutory process underway – Public Local Inquiry expected later this year.

A9 Dualling Pitlochry to Killiecrankie

In Preparation – statutory process underway – Public Local Inquiry Reporter is currently considering written evidence prior to submitting his report to the Scottish Ministers for consideration.

A9 Dualling Killiecrankie to Glen Garry

 

In Preparation – statutory process underway – Public Local Inquiry expected later this year.

A9 Dualling Glen
Garry to Dalwhinnie

 

In Preparation – statutory process underway – Public Local Inquiry Reporter has considered written evidence and submitted his report to Scottish Ministers for consideration.

A9 Dualling
Dalwhinnie to Crubenmore

 

In Preparation – statutory process underway – Public Local Inquiry Reporter is currently considering written evidence prior to submitting her report to the Scottish Ministers for consideration.

A9 Dualling Crubenmore to Kincraig

In Preparation – statutory process underway – draft Orders published with objection resolution process on-going.

A9 Dualling Kincraig
to Dalraddy

Complete.

A9 Dualling Dalraddy to Slochd

 

In Preparation – statutory process underway – draft Orders published with objection resolution process on-going.

A9 Dualling Tomatin
to Moy

 

In Preparation – statutory process underway –Public Local Inquiry expected later this year.

A96 Dualling Inverness to Aberdeen:

Scheme

Status

A96 Dualling
Inverness to Nairn (Including Nairn Bypass)

In Preparation – statutory process underway –Reporters are currently considering evidence heard at Public Local Inquiry prior to submitting their report to the Scottish Ministers for consideration.

A96 Dualling Hardmuir to Fochabers

In Preparation – preferred option announced December 2018 with the detailed development and assessment of the preferred option underway.

A96 Dualling East of Fochabers to East of Huntly

Strategic assessment work completed. Route option development and assessment work to be progressed.

A96 Dualling East of Huntly to Aberdeen

In Preparation – route options development and assessment work underway.

Spend on the A9 and A96 Dualling programmes since the Infrastructure Investment Plan announcement in December 2011 can be found in the following table.

Financial year

A9 Dualling Programme

A96 Dualling Programme

2018-19

£56,179,844.95

£13,384,939.36

2017-18

£55,256,961.44

£14,403,218.25

2016-17

£50,286,213.43

£9,718,183.82

2015-16

£39,580,271.17

£4,292,300.22

2014-15

£10,984,698.42

£2,999,789.06

2013-14

£7,253,605.71

£1,696,711.46

2012-13

£2,817,165.24

£497,580.06

Spend on the A9 and A96 Dualling Programmes in 2019-20 shall be managed within the Capital Land and Works allocation of £212.1m as part of the Motorway and Trunk Roads Spending Plans set out in the Scottish Budget: 2019-20.

Budget for future years will be dependent on the allocation of funding from future spending reviews.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what progress is being made to establish a Low Emission Zone (LEZ) boundary in Dundee, and what information it has on what Dundee City Council’s LEZ Delivery Group’s next steps are.


Answered by Michael Matheson (15/05/2019):

Dundee City Council intend to publish their Low Emission Zone (LEZ) boundary plan in summer 2019. The Council’s LEZ Delivery Group is meeting regularly with their next steps focusing on objective setting, LEZ scope and size options and stakeholder engagement activities. Mr Bowman is advised to contact Tom Stirling at Dundee City Council should he wish to discuss their LEZ plans in more detail.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it will respond to the consultation, The future of civil partnership in Scotland.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (15/05/2019):

The Scottish Government will respond to the consultation on the future of civil partnership shortly.

This consultation was open from September to December 2018. 485 responses were received. The Scottish Government is currently considering these responses as part of our work on preparing the Government response to the consultation.

The background to the consultation is the UK Supreme Court's declaration that the current law of civil partnership is incompatible with the European Convention on Human Rights in that it prevents mixed sex couples from entering into a civil partnership. I intend to take a swift decision on the best legislative route for removal of the ECHR incompatibility from the law in Scotland.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the status is of each section of each trunk road infrastructure project with a total budget of at least £50 million that is planned or in construction, also broken down by how much has been spent each year, and what the budget is for (a) 2019-20 and (b) future years.


Answered by Michael Matheson (15/05/2019):

The current status of each trunk road infrastructure project that is planned or in construction with an estimate of at least £50 million can be found in the following table.

Scheme

Status

A82 Tarbet to Inverarnan

In Preparation – detailed development and assessment of the preferred option underway.with draft Orders expected to be published later this year.

A720 Sheriffhall Junction

In Preparation – detailed development and assessment of the preferred option underway.with draft Orders expected to be published later this year.

A9-A82 Longman Roundabout

In Preparation – option assessment work underway with a preferred option expected to be announced later this year.

Spend on the schemes referenced above can be found in the following table.

Financial year

A82 Tarbet to Inverarnan

A720 Sheriffhall Junction

A9-A82 Longman Roundabout

2018-19

£6,446,126.92

£2,220.966.21

£1,444,463.38

2017-18

£2,908,361.35

£960,100.84

£466,552.69

2016-17

£1,205,750.44

£763,649.39

£81,381.59

2015-16

£916,647.29

£205,954.29

 

2014-15

£1,699,830.55

£257,403.04

 

2013-14

£225,988.39

£45,000.00

 

2012-13

£276,471.53

  

Spend for continuing preparation of A82 Tarbet to Inverarnan, A720 Sheriffhall Junction and A9-A82 Longman Junction Infrastructure schemes in 2019-20 shall be managed within the Capital Land and Works allocation of £212.1m as part of the Motorway and Trunk Roads Spending Plans set out in the Scottish Budget: 2019-20.

Budget for future years will be dependent on the allocation of funding from future spending reviews.

For details on schemes forming part of the A9 or A96 Dualling Programmes I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-22992 on 15 May 2019. All answers to written Parliamentary Questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at http:--www.parliament.scot-parliamentarybusiness-28877.aspx


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its response is to calls by the charity, Miricyl, and other organisations, to set up a children’s mental health research centre.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (15/05/2019):

Applications for applied health research, including in children’s mental health, can be submitted to the two open competitive response mode grant scheme committees operated by the Scottish Government’s Chief Scientist Office. Applications submitted are funded following independent expert assessment of the quality of the research projects proposed with funding recommendations made by an independent expert committee.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what precautions are taken to minimise traffic disruption from roadworks.


Answered by Michael Matheson (15/05/2019):

Trunk Roads in Scotland are managed and maintained by Transport Scotland’s Operating Companies and Design Build Finance and Operate (DBFO) Contractors, on behalf of the Scottish Ministers. The majority of Private roads are the responsibility of their owners. All other roads are maintained and repaired by local authorities.

The ongoing investment and maintenance in the Trunk Road network is key to supporting the continued economic growth of Scotland. However, some degree of disruption is inevitable for these vital works. In planning and delivering these schemes, we aim to minimise impacts on businesses and communities while seeking to maintain access to local businesses and assisting motorists to make alternative travel arrangements.

Our contracts include timing restrictions for certain routes, which limit works from taking place during the busiest periods. The aim is, where possible and safe to do so, to avoid road closures and long diversions but also to avoid the busier tourist seasons and daily peak traffic hours.

For larger schemes or those particularly disruptive to an area, consultation is undertaken with local residents, businesses, elected members, community councils, transport operators, local authorities, emergency services and other local stakeholders on the timing of roadworks. Following this, works are programmed taking into consideration consultation feedback, avoiding local events and the main tourist season where possible.

To ensure schemes are suitably co-ordinated and planned in advance, we also work closely with the Scottish Road Works Commissioner, established to oversee this co-ordination of roadworks on Scotland’s roads by all roads authorities and statutory undertakers (such as utilities and telecoms companies).

To allow road users to plan their journeys and avoid potential disruption, information about roadworks is provided by Traffic Scotland, on their websites, the Traveline Scotland App, Twitter, Traffic Scotland Radio and other platforms. For larger or disruptive schemes, advance notice of the works is displayed at the roadside before the works start, whether on temporary signs or on Traffic Scotland’s ‘Variable Message Signs’.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what percentage of its research funding that is awarded through the Chief Scientist Office and the Scottish Funding Council it will spend on children’s mental health in 2019-20.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (15/05/2019):

Applications for applied health research, including in children’s mental health, can be submitted to the two open competitive response mode grant scheme committees operated by the Scottish Government’s Chief Scientist Office. Applications submitted are funded following independent expert assessment of the quality of the research projects proposed with funding recommendations made by an independent expert committee. Since neither committee has made funding recommendations in financial year 2019-20 as yet, no funding for applications submitted to the committees has been awarded.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what plans it has to conduct a comprehensive equality impact assessment or another process to fulfil its public sector equality duty obligations regarding medical research funding awarded by the Chief Scientist Office and the Scottish Funding Council, as part of a wider review of medical research funding.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (15/05/2019):

An equality impact assessment will be undertaken by the Scottish Government's Chief Scientist Office to support the development of a new health and social care research strategy to replace the current 2015-2020 strategy. The Scottish Funding Council (SFC) does not provide funding specifically for medical research. A review would therefore not be directly relevant to the SFC. The SFC meets its obligations under the Equality Act 2010 by adhering to the Scotland-specific advice and guidance from the Equality and Human Rights Commission.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many children remain unvaccinated against (a) MMR, (b) diphtheria, (c) polio, (d) tetanus, (e) whooping cough, (f) rotavirus, (g) haemophilus influenza type B and (h) meningococcal types A, B, C, W and Y, also broken down by NHS board area.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (15/05/2019):

The vaccination status of children in Scotland is monitored routinely at defined ages to reflect the different immunisation requirements at different ages. This information is available from the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (Bib. number 60685)


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the average number of prisoners held at HMP (a) Addiewell and (b) Kilmarnock has been in each year since 2010-11.


Answered by Ash Denham (15/05/2019):

I have asked Colin McConnell, Chief Executive of the Scottish Prison Service (SPS), to respond. His response is as follows:

The following table shows the average populations at HMP Addiewell and HMP Kilmarnock in each year since 2010-2011.

 

HMP Addiewell

HMP Kilmarnock

2010-2011

700

565

2011-2012

771

631

2012-2013

767

577

2013-2014

699

501

2014-2015

700

501

2015-2016

699

500

2016-2017

699

499

2017-2018

696

499

2018-2019

700

504

2019-2020

705

593


Current Status: Answered by Ash Denham on 15/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what regular reviews the new food allergen alert service will carry out to help ensure that it is as accessible as possible.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

Food Standards Scotland regularly review the alert service including the open rates of emails and texts received. In October 2019 (6 months following the official launch) a survey will be sent to subscribers to collect feedback about the service which will include the accessibility of the text alert system.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, following the publication of the Engender report, Our Bodies, Our Rights, what action it has taken to include the rights and needs of disabled women in health and care policy frameworks.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

The Health and Social Care Standards took effect on 1 April 2018. The Standards seek to provide better personal outcomes for everyone and to ensure that the human rights we are all entitled to are upheld. The Standards are focussed on the individual experiences of people using services and underpinned by five principles: Dignity and respect; Compassion; Be included; Responsive care and support; and Wellbeing.

The Engender report identified key issues of concern about disabled women’s reproductive rights. All women have a right to good sexual and reproductive health care. Achieving this is a key aspect of gender equality being reached, but we will not achieve this unless all women receive quality care, and this must include disabled women. The Engender report has been considered by Ministers across key portfolios and action is being taken. For example, for the first time we have included priority actions on sexual health and parenting rights in our learning disability strategy “the Keys to Life”, published in March 2019. It recognises the rights of women with learning disabilities to enjoy and maintain sexual relationships, addresses discrimination around reproductive rights and recognises the need for appropriate sexual health and parenting education supported by access to services.

The Scottish Government is committed to ensuring that sexual health services in Scotland are all-inclusive and accessible to all disabled women. Following the publication of the Engender report, we have contacted all Sexual Health lead clinicians to learn what can be done to improve disabled women’s experience of sexual health services.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what plans it has to support the national roll-out of the register that identifies the number of patients with epilepsy, which is operated by NHS Tayside and NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

We have been interested to hear about the database project developed by NHS Tayside and NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, and to consider how it has been used in work around methadone and sodium valproate.

As part of our National Action Plan on Neurological Conditions, we wish to better understand people’s interactions with services and have therefore been working with NHS Information Services Division to understand the gaps in prevalence and how best to improve data. Over the next five years, we will implement the action plan and continue to engage with stakeholders to take account of learning from projects such as the epilepsy database to shape future data systems and processes.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the percentage uptake of childhood vaccination for (a) MMR, (b) diphtheria, (c) polio, (d) tetanus, (e) whooping cough, (f) rotavirus, (g) haemophilus influenza type B, (h) meningococcal types A, B, C, W and Y has been in each of the last five years, also broken down by NHS board area.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

Information services division (ISD) produce an annual report which sets out the uptake rate across Scotland of each of the childhood vaccinations. Please see the following link: https://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Child-Health/Publications/2019-03-26/2019-03-26-Childhood-Immunisation-Report.pdf?94450014830

Teenage booster vaccinations are published in a separate annual report which can be accessed via the following link:https://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Child-Health/Publications/2018-11-27/2018-11-27-TeenBooster-Report.pdf .


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on standardising food allergy protocols in restaurants and other food outlets, and developing a food allergy training programme for such businesses.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

FSS alongside the Food Standards Agency (FSA), developed practical guidance on the interpretation and practical application of the specific requirements laid out in the EU Regulation on allergen information.

MenuCal is a free online tool that supports two areas of FSS work in the out of home catering settings: mandatory provision of allergen information and voluntary energy labelling. It is available on the FSS website and is currently being promoted to food businesses via Environmental Health in Scottish LA’s.

The FSS website carries a link to an interactive online training tool that was developed with FSA when it was formerly FSA Scotland. The training material covers catering and manufacturing premises and consists of six modules that are specific to allergen information.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what support it has provided to the hospitality sector in each of the last five years to support education and training regarding food allergies.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

Food Standards Scotland (FSS) has developed guidance and tools to support food businesses, including caterers regarding food allergies, which is freely available on its website. These resources include:

  • MenuCal, a free online tool that supports two areas of FSS work in the out of home catering settings: mandatory provision of allergen information and voluntary energy (calorie) labelling.
  • Technical guidance developed with the Food Standards Agency (FSA) in order to support food businesses (including caterers) with the implementation of the applicable food law. It provides practical guidance on the interpretation and practical application of the specific requirements laid out in the Regulation on allergen information.

In addition, FSS jointly developed an interactive online training tool that covers catering and manufacturing premises and consists of six modules that are specific to allergen information.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on making it compulsory for restaurants and other food outlets to train dedicated staff members to oversee the preparation of food for customers with allergies.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

As a matter of best practice, food business operators (FBOs) should consider using a system where staff direct allergen queries to a nominated person to ensure the consistency of allergen information to consumers. However, under the law there are overarching requirements that FBOs must provide safe food and ensure that their staff are trained on hygienic and safe food production. Technical guidance, tools and training material to support allergen training is available via the Food Standards Scotland website. In addition, external training and accreditation is available through organisations such as the Royal Environmental Health Institute of Scotland.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many instances of homophobia have been reported in (a) North Ayrshire, (b) Inverclyde and (c) Scotland in each of the last 10 years.


Answered by Ash Denham (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government does not hold the specific information requested. However, in February 2019, the Scottish Government published a report entitled “Developing information on hate crime recorded by the police in Scotland”. This report covers the years 2014-15 to 2017-18 and includes the number of hate crimes that were aggravated by the five hate strands (race, religion, sexual orientation, disability and transgender identity). The following table shows the number of hate crimes recorded by Police Scotland with a sexual orientation aggravator for the past four years for North Ayrshire, Inverclyde and Scotland. Information for all local authorities is available in the web tables at the following link: https://www.gov.scot/publications/developing-information-hate-crime-recorded-police-scotland/

The figures presented in Table 1 relate to crimes which have been perceived by the victim or any other person, to be motivated (wholly or partly) by malice and ill-will towards a social group based on sexual orientation. This is not necessarily limited to homophobia and could include other sexual orientations. A person does not need to be a member of a social group to be the victim of a hate crime. The law states that the identity of the victim is irrelevant as to whether something is a hate crime or not; the motivation of the perpetrator is the key factor in defining a hate crime. Furthermore, this will not include any incidents which did not include the committing of a crime or instances of homophobia that were not reported to the police.

Table 1. Hate crimes recorded by the police, with a sexual orientation aggravator, 2014-15 to 2017-18

 

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

     

North Ayrshire

18

27

38

25

     

Inverclyde

8

16

15

24

     

Scotland

1,010

1,020

1,025

1,085

     

Source: Additional analysis of Developing information on hate crime recorded by the police in Scotland

   

Current Status: Answered by Ash Denham on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much funding it has provided to the University of West Scotland in each of the last 10 years.


Answered by Richard Lochhead (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government have provided a total of £719,764,942 in funding to the University of West of Scotland over a 10 year period between 2008-09 to 2018-19. This funding includes, for example, grants for teaching, research, access and capital maintenance.

Further breakdown by year is provided in the following table;

Scottish Government Funding 2008-09 -2018-19

Year

Total (£)

2008-09

65,430,999

2009-10

65,904,223

2010-11

63,886,592

2011-12

58,375,486

2012-13

63,858,782

2013-14

65,881,988

2014-15

67,748,592

2015-16

67,362,326

2016-17

66,012,193

2017-18

66,247,451

2018-19

69,056,310

Source: Scottish Funding Council - May 2019


Current Status: Answered by Richard Lochhead on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what engagement it has had with the National Screening Committee ahead of the publication of the full findings of the recent international study (the NELSON trial) into the impact of the use of CT screening to assist with the early identification of lung cancer.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government, along with the rest of the UK, is advised on all aspects of screening by the UK National Screening Committee (UK NSC) an independent expert advisory group. The Scottish Government is represented on the UK NSC and is fully engaged in discussions around the results of the NELSON randomised lung cancer screening trial.

UK NSC recommendations are based on robust, peer-reviewed, published evidence, and while the preliminary results from the NELSON study are promising and encouraging, the UK NSC await the full published report from the NELSON study before making any recommendations regarding screening for lung cancer.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many instances of racially motivated assaults have been reported in (a) North Ayrshire, (b) Inverclyde and (c) Scotland in each of the last 10 years.


Answered by Ash Denham (14/05/2019):

In February 2019, the Scottish Government published a report entitled “Developing information on hate crime recorded by the police in Scotland”. This report includes the number the hate crimes that were aggravated by the five hate strands (race, religion, sexual orientation, disability and transgender identity).

Table 1 includes additional analysis of the dataset used to produce the report ‘Developing Information on Hate Crime Recorded by the Police in Scotland’ and shows the number of assaults, including Attempted murder, Serious assault and Common assaults, recorded by the police with a race aggravator for the past four years for North Ayrshire, Inverclyde and Scotland. Further information is available at the following link: https://www.gov.scot/publications/developing-information-hate-crime-recorded-police-scotland/ .

The Scottish Government previously published information on Racist Incidents Recorded by the Police, derived from a different source. Table 2 includes further analysis of this dataset and shows the number of assaults, including Attempted murder, Serious assault and Common assaults, recorded by Police Scotland as part of racist incidents for the years 2008-10 to 2013-14 for North Ayrshire, Inverclyde and Scotland. Further information is available at the following link: https://www.gov.scot/publications/racist-incidents-recorded-police-scotland-2013-14/ .

The tables relate to crimes which have been perceived by the victim or any other person, to be motivated (wholly or partly) by malice and ill-will towards a social group based on race. A person does not need to be a member of a social group to be the victim of a hate crime. The law states that the identity of the victim is irrelevant as to whether something is a hate crime or not; the motivation of the perpetrator is the key factor in defining a hate crime. Furthermore, this will not include any incidents which did not include the committing of a crime or racially aggravated assaults that were not reported to the police.

It is important to note that the tables presented here are not directly comparable as they are derived from different sources. Table 1 is based on information taken from Police Scotland’s Interim Vulnerable Persons Database (IVPD), an incident-based database which was introduced in 2013, and became a national system in 2014, whereas Table 2 is based on information previously extracted annually from individual Police Scotland crime management systems.

Table 1. Number of assaults 1 recorded by the police, with a race aggravator 2 , 2014-15 to 2017-18

         
 

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

             

North Ayrshire

13

*

*

7

             

Inverclyde

8

*

*

-

             

Scotland

646

573

664

685

             

Source: Additional analysis of the extract of data from the Interim Vulnerable Persons Database (IVPD) used to produce the report ‘Developing Information on Hate Crime Recorded by the Police in Scotland’

 

Table 2. Number of assaults 1 recorded by the police as part of racist incidents, 2014-15 to 2017-18

   
 

2008-10

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

     

North Ayrshire

16

25

10

18

7

9

     

Inverclyde

8

*

*

10

*

*

     

Scotland

728

723

733

754

593

628

     

Source: Additional analysis of the extract of data used to produce the report ‘Racist incidents recorded by the police in Scotland, 2013-14’

            

1 Includes Attempted Murder, Serious assault and Common assault

      

2 Will also include some crimes where there may have been multiple aggravators for example if a crime was aggravated by race and religion.

*' indicates a value of less than five.

         

-' indicates a value of zero.

          

 


Current Status: Answered by Ash Denham on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much it spent on baby boxes up until 17 March 2019.


Answered by Maree Todd (14/05/2019):

The total expenditure for Scotland’s Baby Box up until 17 March 2019 is £14,207,369.47

  • 2016-17     £186,493.27
  • 2017-18     £7,527,764.49
  • 2018 - 17 March 2019 £6,493,111.71

Current Status: Answered by Maree Todd on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what analysis it has carried out of the Manchester lung health check pilot programme, which uses CT screening to assist with the early identification of lung cancer and is being rolled out across NHS England, and what its position is on introducing a similar approach across Scotland.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government, along with the rest of the UK, is advised on all aspects of screening by the UK National Screening Committee (UK NSC) an independent expert advisory group. The UK NSC will review the evidence for lung cancer screening once the results of the NELSON randomised lung cancer screening trial are published. If there is any change in the recommendations of the UK NSC this will be carefully considered by the Scottish Government.

The Scottish Government is currently exploring what opportunities exist for Scotland to contribute to the emerging evidence base for lung cancer screening in discussions with the Chair of the UK NSC, and the Scottish Screening Committee.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what information it has regarding how much it will cost the Department of Health and Social Care to deliver welfare foods under agency arrangements in Scotland.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government will pay for the costs incurred for delivery of welfare foods under agency agreement with Department of Health and Social Care. The costs for financial year 2019-20 are estimated to be in the region of £45,000.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what additional action the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) is taking to prevent the outbreak of wildfires, such as the recent incident in Moray, which was the largest recorded in Scotland, and following reports that 2019 has saw more such fires across the UK than any other year; what ministerial meetings it had had or plans with the SFRS regarding this, and what additional support it is offering to the service to carry out this work.


Answered by Ash Denham (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) is aware that the risks faced by communities are changing for many reasons, as referenced in the SFRS high level transformation plan, and this includes risks associated with climate change. SFRS must therefore prepare for new challenges as Scotland faces more extremes of weather (including increased flooding and dramatic wildfires, particularly in more rural parts of the country). A wildfires strategy is currently being developed by the SFRS and partners which will ensure that SFRS has the right resources in the right place at the right time to fight wildfires.

SFRS must continue to ensure that personnel are equipped and trained to deal with these emerging risks, and that their service delivery model has sufficient resilience and flexibility to support incidents that can occur over extended geographies and timescales.

Regarding the recent incident in Moray, I have once again been struck by the outstanding bravery and dedication of our firefighters to keep our communities and environment safe. Immediately after the Moray wildfire I spoke directly with the SFRS lead officer for wildfires.

The Scottish Government is working with SFRS and the Scottish Wildfire Forum (SWF) to develop a wildfire risk scenario for Scotland and to improve Fire Danger Assessments. This will support individuals and agencies in planning for and responding to wildfire events and ensure that responders in Scotland are better placed to anticipate, assess, prevent and respond to and recover from wildfires.

Decisions on the allocation of SFRS resources are an operational matter for the service. In 2019-20 the Scottish Government has increased the funding to SFRS by £5.5 million to invest in service transformation plans. This is on top of the
‎ £15.5 million additional spending power provided last year.


Current Status: Answered by Ash Denham on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of concerns raised by the British Dental Association, (a) how many anaesthetists there are and (b) what the theatre capacity is for children's teeth extraction under general anaesthetic in each NHS board.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (14/05/2019):

Staff carrying out this procedure are likely to be categorised within one of the three groups below, for which WTE numbers of staff in post across NHS Scotland are given:

  • Anaesthetics Consultants: 765.8 WTE as at December 2018.
  • Oral Surgery: 108.1 WTE as at December 2018.
  • Paediatric Dentistry: 27.6 WTE as at December 2018.

However, data published by ISD Scotland does not provide details of what an individual’s role entails within these groups.

It is the responsibility of NHS Boards to have the correct theatre capacity in place to meet local priorities and ensure high quality patient care.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the commitment in its paper, A Trading Nation – a plan for growing Scotland’s exports, to expand GlobalScot to have 2,000 business people in key markets, by what date it expects to achieve the 2,000 target.


Answered by Ivan McKee (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government, working in close collaboration with our enterprise agencies and other delivery partners, intends to significantly scale up the GlobalScot network, expanding from 600 to 2000 business people in key markets, including doubling to 500 in Europe by 2020. Further growth in the wider GlobalScot network will be subject to identifying individuals with the requisite skills and experience in our priority markets and sectors. Any experienced business people in international markets who feel they may be able to support Scotland’s trade and investment drive as a Global Scot are encouraged to contact Scottish Enterprise.


Current Status: Answered by Ivan McKee on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the commitment in its paper, A Trading Nation – a plan for growing Scotland’s exports, to support the Scottish business network in exploiting trade opportunities from London, how much support it will provide and how the network will use this to exploit these opportunities.


Answered by Ivan McKee (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government will provide up to £300,000 to the Scottish Business Network (SBN) over the next 2 years to help support Scottish businesses to target trade opportunities specifically in London and potentially in other key parts of the UK.

This funding will be used to extend the scope of current activity of the Scottish Business Network as well as increasing their membership to ensure future sustainability. SBN will deliver more export themed networking events in London and Scotland and will deliver more export themed masterclasses to encourage global mind-sets in Scottish businesses. SBN will be part of developing new relationships with key organisations in London and Scotland to create a supportive diaspora eco-system that is aimed at supporting Scottish businesses to fully understand the potential trading opportunities in London and the rest of the UK and how to use London as a gateway to wider international opportunities.


Current Status: Answered by Ivan McKee on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many of its in-market specialists focus on exporting to the rest of the UK.


Answered by Ivan McKee (14/05/2019):

Our in-market specialists are based overseas and are focussed on generating international exports, not UK domestic trade. However, supporting businesses to increase their sales within the UK is also important. Around £300 million of business support is available to companies in Scotland through our enterprise agencies to help businesses to grow and develop, including to increase their sales to the wider UK market.

The Trade Board has commissioned a survey of Scottish businesses to better understand what trade support they believe would be useful in the London market and we will consider that information carefully to determine what action is required.

In addition, the recently launched A Trading Nation – a plan for growing Scotland’s exports , outlines other measures to support and enhance the existing business support offer. This includes, support for the establishment of stronger business networks in London, in particular, to support the Scottish Business Network over the next 2 years to build capacity that helps Scottish businesses to exploit opportunities in London and the rest of the UK.

Scotland House, in the heart of the London is a valuable resource for Scottish businesses moving into this market, providing a great venue for business and networking events. A key objective of the development of Scotland House is to take advantage of London’s status as a ‘global gateway’ for both trade and investment, supported by joint working between the Scottish Government and its agencies.


Current Status: Answered by Ivan McKee on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the commitment in its paper, A Trading Nation – a plan for growing Scotland’s exports, to provide £2 million for chambers of commerce to deliver a number of trade missions over three years, how many new missions will be delivered, and where these will be located.


Answered by Ivan McKee (14/05/2019):

The First Minister at the Scottish Chambers of Commerce Annual Business Address on 7 December 2018 announced that funding of up to £2 million would be made available to the Scottish chamber of commerce network over the next 3 years to support the development of a programme of activity, including trade missions, which will help Scottish businesses to exploit opportunities in key international markets.

The Scottish Chambers has key business links with Chambers in other countries which are of great benefit to Scottish businesses and they have shown through the initial International Trade Partnership Programme the valuable impact the Chambers can have on introducing Scottish companies to new markets.

We will be working closely with Scottish Chambers of Commerce as they develop a programme of inward and outward trade missions which are in line with the aims set out in A Trading Nation . The Chambers will look to deliver as many trade missions as is possible over the 3 year period, focussing on markets which will have the most impact, within the resources available. The majority of outward trade missions will target the top 15 international markets as identified in the Export Growth Plan. This also provides scope for missions to be delivered in other developing markets where specific trade opportunities have been identified by Scottish businesses.


Current Status: Answered by Ivan McKee on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the commitment in its paper, A Trading Nation – a plan for growing Scotland’s exports, to treble its number of trade envoys to 12, by what date the new envoys will be in place, and where they will be located.


Answered by Ivan McKee (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government will continue to develop the network of Trade Envoys to support Scotland’s aspiration to grow exports. The expansion of the network will be subject to identifying and recruiting suitable candidates with the right knowledge, experience and connections in the right markets.

Our priority is to grow the Trade Envoy network to represent markets where there are significant cultural, linguistic and business differences; more distant markets that are less visited by ministers; specific sectors of established growth markets where we perceive our export performance is lacking; and growing emerging markets where we do not yet have a permanent Scottish trade development presence. The focus will be on markets identified in ‘A Trading Nation’ as current and future export growth priorities.


Current Status: Answered by Ivan McKee on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how the Sestran Regional Model (SRM12) takes account of step changes in (a) transport patterns and (b) land use that could result from new infrastructure.


Answered by Michael Matheson (14/05/2019):

(a) SRM12 considers responses to traveller choices such as which route to take, which mode to use and where to travel to. SRM12 can be run for a number of forecast years to help better understand forecast ‘step changes’ over time. These will include “Do-Something” runs in forecast years with a new transport infrastructure option added to the model.

(b) SRM12 is a typical transport model and does not by itself deal with land-use changes. These land-use changes are considered in the Transport and Economic Land Model of Scotland (TELMoS) which provides forecasts of employment, housing and population based on forecast planning data and economic data. SRM12 takes into consideration the outputs from TELMoS to determine the impact of new transport infrastructure options.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what funding is available to individuals to train as HGV operators.


Answered by Jamie Hepburn (14/05/2019):

Scottish Government policy is to provide a contribution towards Modern Apprenticeship training administered by Skills Development Scotland, with employers expected to make a contribution to additional costs of training.

The contribution rates for the Freight Logistics (Driving Goods Vehicle) Modern Apprenticeship framework for the current year 2019/20 are;

  • Individuals Aged 16-19: SCQF Level 5 £2,700, Level 6 £4,500
  • Individuals Aged 20-24: SCQF Level 5 £1,550, Level 6 £2,500
  • Individuals Aged 25+: SCQF Level 5 £1,000, Level 6 £2,000

Skills Development Scotland contract annually with training providers, colleges, universities and employers to deliver Modern Apprenticeship training. They have recently awarded the Road Haulage Association their first Modern Apprenticeship contract for Freight Logistics Apprenticeships. The Freight Logistics framework applies to both Long Goods Vehicles and Heavy Good Vehicles.


Current Status: Answered by Jamie Hepburn on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many planning applications for new build residential properties have been refused by a planning authority but successfully appealed to the Scottish Ministers since 2007, broken down by (a) planning authority, (b) year, (c) applicant and (d) size of proposed development.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (14/05/2019):

The information requested is given in the tables entitled “Planning appeals allowed, broken down by planning authority and by year" and "Planning appeals allowed, broken down by appellant and size of development", a copy of which has been placed in the Scottish Parliament’s Information Centre (Bib number 60674).

Case files held by the Planning and Environmental Appeals Division (DPEA) are generally retained for 10 years from the date of the decision prior to being destroyed. Therefore some of the information sought (from 2007 until April 2009) is not held. The information within the tables provided relates to decisions issued by DPEA from the period 07-05-2009 to 06-05-2019 (inclusive).

DPEA has been recording appeals for developments of '10 or more houses' since 1 January 2015. This category was added to the existing descriptive categories of 'single dwelling' and 'more than one house'. Therefore appeals received prior to that date, which may fit into the category of 'more than 10 houses' are recorded in the relevant table(s) but may be included in the data within the category of 'more than one house'.


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many affordable homes were built in 2018-19, broken down by local authority.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (14/05/2019):

The following table shows the number of affordable homes delivered in 2018-19 between 1 April 2018 and 31 December 2018. Figures for the final quarter, 1 January 2019 to 31 March 2019, will be published in June 2019 and may differ slightly from the figures previously published by the Scottish Government More Homes Division for a number of reasons, including: differences in data extraction dates and changes made to the historical data after the original publication.

All published quarterly figures for 2018-19 can be found at the following link: https://www2.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Housing-Regeneration

Please note that as well as new build homes, the Affordable Housing Supply Programme includes rehabilitation projects, off the shelf purchases and homes for low-cost home ownership from existing housing stock:

Council

New Build

Off the Shelf

Rehabilitation

TOTAL

Aberdeenshire

138

85

0

223

Angus

57

15

0

72

Argyll & Bute

62

3

0

65

City of Aberdeen

232

205

0

437

Clackmannanshire

31

6

0

37

Dumfries & Galloway

59

28

0

87

Dundee

99

38

0

137

East Ayrshire

46

1

0

47

East Dunbartonshire

8

2

0

10

East Lothian

63

87

0

150

East Renfrewshire

8

2

0

10

Edinburgh

453

137

0

590

Falkirk

30

51

0

81

Fife

167

104

0

271

Glasgow

389

86

41

516

Highland

418

152

4

574

Inverclyde

41

4

0

45

Midlothian

83

80

0

163

Moray

32

12

0

44

North Ayrshire

180

12

0

192

North Lanarkshire

193

39

0

232

Orkney Islands

28

2

0

30

Perth & Kinross

102

216

0

318

Renfrewshire

127

17

0

144

Scottish Borders

126

48

0

174

Shetland

16

0

0

16

South Ayrshire

0

0

0

0

South Lanarkshire

98

20

10

128

Stirling

47

13

0

60

West Dunbartonshire

84

12

0

96

West Lothian

336

230

0

566

Western Isles

4

1

3

8

TOTAL

3,757

1,708

58

5,523

 


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on the use of Applied Behavioural Analysis in schools for young people with autism.


Answered by John Swinney (14/05/2019):

The approaches used by schools in the provision of support for pupils with autism is a matter for local authorities and schools. They are empowered to decide how to best meet the needs of individual pupils.

Healthcare Improvement Scotland’s SIGN Clinical Guideline 145 Assessment, diagnosis and interventions for autism spectrum disorders indicates that “Access to support from staff trained in applied behaviour analysis-based technologies (eg Picture Exchange Communication System, discrete trial training, task analysis, prompting, fading or shaping) to build independence in adaptive, communication and social skills should be considered for children with ASD”.

Furthermore, we have taken action to establish a short-life working group drawing together key stakeholders in order to look into areas affecting pupils with autism in schools.


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much ScotRail has paid to passengers in compensation in each month since April 2018, also broken down by what estimate it has made of how much potential compensation has been unclaimed.


Answered by Michael Matheson (14/05/2019):

From April 2018 to April 2019 ScotRail has paid entitled passengers a total of £1,119,818.35 through the Delay Repay Scheme.

It is not possible accurately to determine how much compensation is unclaimed.

Passengers can apply for compensation if their journey is delayed by 30 minutes or more and if they miss a connection because of a delay on a ScotRail train. Compensation is straightforward to claim by using the ScotRail app or at staffed stations and ScotRail’s web-site provides details of additional compensation that passengers may claim.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of reported recent incidents, including those involving pets being caught in snares, what its response is to claims that its legislation governing snaring is not fit for purpose and the calls for it to legislate to make the sale, use and manufacture of snares illegal.


Answered by Mairi Gougeon (14/05/2019):

A review into snaring every 5 years is required by Section 11F of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) undertook a review in 2016 and the outcome was published in 2017. This found that snaring-related incidents have reduced following snaring regulations introduced through the Wildlife and Natural Environment (Scotland) Act 2011 and the Snares (Scotland) Order 2010. The SNH review also made recommendations that will further improve snaring practices and components.

The Scottish Government is considering these recommendations.


Current Status: Answered by Mairi Gougeon on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether the Sestran Regional Model (SRM12) includes the East Neuk and takes account of the value of the railhead that Levenmouth could provide.


Answered by Michael Matheson (14/05/2019):

The geographical scope of the SRM12 model covers the South East of Scotland, including the whole of Fife and the East Neuk. The Sestran Regional Model is a tool which may be used to provide quantitative evidence as part of Scottish Transport Appraisal Guidance (STAG) which should be used for transport appraisal in Scotland. A transport appraisal determines the overall value of the multi-modal options. This involves the appraisal of each option against the transport planning objectives and the five STAG criteria, including the Environment, Safety, Economy, Integration, and Accessibility and Social Inclusion. The Levenmouth Sustainable Transport Study is being undertaken in line with STAG and includes a railhead at Levenmouth as one of the multi-modal options under consideration.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government for what reason the Sestran Regional Model (SRM12) indicates that Fife housing and employment growth contributes to increased traffic into Edinburgh but the mitigation measures do not refer to any measures beyond the Edinburgh area, including the Levenmouth rail link.


Answered by Michael Matheson (14/05/2019):

The desirability to travel to Edinburgh from those residing in Fife, is a reflection of the number and type of employment, education and shopping opportunities offered by a city the size of Edinburgh. The SRM12 reflects this attractiveness when the calculating the number of trips being made between Fife and Edinburgh in its base and future forecast year models taking account of the cost, availability and mode of travel to make these trips.

The SRM12 includes a number of future “Do Minimum” forecasts years, for example 2017, 2022 and 2027, which include all known committed transport infrastructure projects and planned service updates across the modelled area. For the purpose of appraisal, a transport option or measure (new transport service or infrastructure project) will then be added to the model to form the “Do Something” situation. The resultant changes between the Do Minimum and Do Something are then compared to assess the impact of the transport option. An example of a committed scheme in the 2017 forecast year is the Queensferry Crossing and associated road network changes which was not open in 2012. The Levenmouth rail link is not a committed scheme or transport measure and is therefore not included in any Do Minimum scenario.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its assessment is of the maximum time that people will commute for (a) jobs and (b) education, and how this was accounted for in the scope of the Sestran Regional Model (SRM12).


Answered by Michael Matheson (14/05/2019):

There is no explicit maximum time that people would be willing to commute for jobs or travel to education in SRM12 which is typical of transport models. The SRM12 represents weekday morning, afternoon and evening peak hours and people will travel from their origin to their destination based on their journey purpose, the overall cost of their journey and the transport modes available to them.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-19849 by John Swinney on 20 November 2018, whether it plans to carry out an evaluation of the money given to local authorities to provide mental health first aid training to school staff.


Answered by John Swinney (14/05/2019):

Delivery of the Mental Health First Aid Training programme is administered by NHS Health Scotland and Education Scotland and is a valuable and important element of the provision of mental health support for everyone who works with children and young people.

Scotland’s Mental Health First Aid Training is delivered by a qualified Scottish Mental Health First Aid instructor and is continuously monitored by NHS Health Scotland.

Local authorities whose staff have undertaken the training, provide a summary and a brief evaluation of the impact of the training within their authority area, to Education Scotland on an annual basis. Education Scotland is currently undertaking an audit of the number of teachers and school staff in all local authorities that have undergone the training in order to identify future Career-Long Professional Learning requirements.


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many social security programme staff have recorded (a) short- and (b) long-term absences in the last year.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (14/05/2019):

88 directly employed staff in the Programme Management and Delivery division recorded a short term sick absence during the year 1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019.

10 directly employed staff in the Programme Management and Delivery division recorded a long term sick absence during the year 1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action it is taking to ensure that fire breaks are adequately maintained by swiping or other methods on Forestry Commission Scotland-owned land and forests, following reports of many moorland wildfires in 2019, and what analysis it has carried out of the effectiveness of this work recently.


Answered by Fergus Ewing (14/05/2019):

Forestry and Land Scotland (FLS) take a landscape level approach to land management, endeavouring to manage the land under its care with regard to a number of risks, including wildfire. This is focused primarily on employment of best practice in land management planning, wildfire prevention and wildfire suppression operations. Management of rides and roadsides through mowing and flailing does take place on parts of Scotland’s national forests and land where required e.g. some mature forests and new woodland creation sites. This work is undertaken to meet a number of objectives, including access management, conservation, wildlife management and safety.

Analysis of recent wildfires, prevention and control methods is an ongoing subject of joint working between FLS and other partners within the Scottish Wildfire Forum led by the Scottish Fire & Rescue Service (SFRS). At a national level FLS is working on a number of items related to wildfire management on Scotland’s national forests and land. This has included a joint SFRS and FLS wildfire scenario exercise and discussions regarding communications, wildfire danger assessments, fire plans, fire mapping and recording and data sharing. Working with SFRS, FLS is committed to seek out and follow developments in wildfire management practice. An output of wildfire research within the forestry sector is the practice guide titled ‘Building Wildfire Resilience into Forest Management Planning’ which FLS staff use as guidance in their land management decision making.


Current Status: Answered by Fergus Ewing on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government which NHS boards automatically put in place an airway management plan for people with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) when they are admitted to hospital.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (14/05/2019):

Scottish Government does not hold this information centrally. NHS Boards and healthcare professionals locally have responsibility for service delivery and patient treatment. For this reason NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde Board would be best placed to provide this information. The contact details can be found online at https://www.nhsggc.org.uk/.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what processes are followed ahead of a bone marrow transplant for people with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) to ensure that there is sufficient expertise and experience available to guarantee patient safety.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (14/05/2019):

Normal governance mechanisms are in place to ensure that that treatments are planned by a multi-disciplinary team who are accredited specialists and who undergo regular revalidation.

The recommendation of any medical intervention is based on risk versus benefit considerations. These risks being those actual and immediate ones and those anticipated by the anticipated progression of the underlying condition leading to complications (including limited treatment options, increased complication rates and including worsening health compromise, disability and /or further limitation of life expectancy). Benefits from successful treatment have to be viewed within the context that all treatments (or having no treatment) carries inherent risks as described and that successful treatment (partial or complete) are expected to have short and long term benefits for the individual patient. The process of consent for treatment is a culmination of a process that seeks to address the risk / benefits described above. Accepting that there is a range in the way that any individual patient will be affected by an underlying condition, the nature of MPS is such that their management and any treatment offered has to be individualised. Bone marrow transplant (BMT) is offered on the basis of these risk / benefit assessments in the context of the utility of BMT compared with other treatment options and all treatments have limitations and therefore fluctuating risk / benefits.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the mortality rate is for people with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), and which NHS boards routinely provide this information when consulting patients regarding bone marrow transplant procedures.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (14/05/2019):

Scottish Government does not hold this information centrally. NHS Boards and healthcare professionals locally have responsibility for service delivery and patient treatment. For this reason NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde Board would be best placed to provide this information. The contact details can be found online at https://www.nhsggc.org.uk/.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much funding it awards to the Primary Biliary Cholangitis Foundation.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government recognises the importance of the third sector in providing valuable support to those with Primary Biliary Cholangitis.

To date, the Primary Biliary Cholangitis Foundation has been awarded £73,340 by the Scottish Government.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it supports people with primary biliary cholangitis.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government expects NHS Boards to provide high quality, person-centred care for all people, including those with suspected, or confirmed diagnosis of Primary Biliary Cholangitis.

Scotland has an implementation plan for rare diseases, published 2014, which includes 51 commitments. A progress report, published 2018, sets out progress towards meeting these commitments http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2018/02/8601 .


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body what discussions it has had with the fund trustees regarding the investment policy for the Scottish Parliamentary Pension Scheme in relation to fossil fuels and related industries.


Answered by Kezia Dugdale (14/05/2019):

Following the completion of the recent triennial valuation of the scheme the trustees commenced a review of the scheme investment strategy. As part of the review process the fund trustees met with the SPCB, as the scheme sponsor, on Thursday 25th October 2018 to seek their views on the investment strategy. The meeting covered all aspect of the scheme investment strategy including investment in fossil fuels and related industries.


Current Status: Answered by Kezia Dugdale on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of reports in the Daily Express on 17 April 2019 that 2,000 post offices throughout the UK are expected to close in 2019, what information it has regarding which branches in Scotland are (a) due to close and (b) under a threat of closure, and what action it can take to prevent these closures, including what discussions it plans with the UK Government.

 

 


Answered by Jamie Hepburn (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government has no further information to that reported in the Daily Express on 17 April 2019; however, it does consistently and repeatedly make clear to both the UK Government and Post Office Ltd. that post offices are necessary for local communities and economies in Scotland, particularly in some of its more remote rural areas, and that existing services should be maintained rather than reduced.

Despite this being a reserved area, the Scottish Government does what it can to provide support and continues to:

  • fund Citizens Advice Scotland’s research into post office outreach services and how consumers can influence provision in rural areas; and
  • provide the most generous package of non-domestic rates reliefs anywhere in the UK:
  • Scotland's Small Business Bonus Scheme delivers the full 100% relief for rateable values up to £15,000 and 25% relief for those with a rateable value up to £18,000, which is significantly more generous than anywhere else in the UK;
  • Mandatory rural rate relief awards post offices with 100% relief if the property is in certain rural areas which have a population below 3,000, and the premises has a rateable value below £8,500.

The Scottish Government also ran the Post Office Diversification Fund, which provided £1 million in 2010-11, and a further £1 million in 2011-12.


Current Status: Answered by Jamie Hepburn on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action it takes to ensure that people with ME receive adequate medical care and support, and what its response is to reports that some health professionals do not recognise the condition as a neurological illness.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Good Practice Statement on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) clearly highlights that some psychological therapies, such as graded exercise therapy (GET) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), are not effective for everyone and it specifically states their use remains controversial. It also advises people with ME should not be pressed into accepting unwanted treatments and, as with all other medical conditions, have the right to refuse any specific treatment offered.

The Scottish Government and NHS Scotland recognise the World Health Organisation definition of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) as a neurological condition. Healthcare professionals are expected to be aware of recognised guidelines, such as the National Institute of Care and Excellence and the Scottish Good Practice Statement on ME/CFS, and to treat people, so they receive appropriate care and support for their symptoms, regardless of the professional's personal views.

We are committed to ensuring that people in Scotland living with ME are able to access the best possible care and support, and benefit from healthcare services that are safe, effective and put people at the centre of their care. We continue to work with the neurological community, including those living with ME, to develop Scotland’s first National Action Plan on Neurological Conditions. We are carefully considering feedback received during a recent consultation and will publish our final plan later this year.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the evidence given by the Cabinet Secretary for Health and Sport to the Public Petitions Committee on 24 January 2019 regarding petition PE1690 (Official Report, c. 30), whether it will provide details of how the proposed working group on ME will operate; what the timescale will be for its set up and operation, and how it will involve people with lived experience of the condition.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-22686 on 14 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what research it (a) has conducted and (b) plans to conduct into excessive sugar consumption and its suppression of the enzyme, glutamine synthetase.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government funds research through the Chief Scientist's office.

Researchers can apply to the Chief Scientist Office for funding. The CSO's Translational Clinical Studies Committee and the Health Improvement, Protection and Services Research Committees each meet twice per year to consider funding applications. Details of the application process are published on the CSO website. http://www.cso.scot.nhs.uk/funding-2/

Applications looking at excessive sugar consumption and its suppression of the enzyme, glutamine synthetase may be submitted to the CSO funding committees. In common with all other applications, these would go through the CSO's standard independent peer review process.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask Scottish Government when the first payments from the Advance Payment Scheme for survivors of childhood abuse in care will be made.


Answered by John Swinney (14/05/2019):

The Advance Payment Scheme opened on 25 April 2019 for those abused in care in Scotland who are either aged 70 or above, or who are terminally ill. Applicants are eligible to apply for a flat rate payment of £10,000, providing tangible recognition of the harm done to them as children

I am pleased to confirm that the first 5 payments have already been processed. Subject to the required appraisal checks, we hope to be able to approve a further 8 applications this week with a further 36 applications currently being considered.

Around 150 calls were taken in the first two weeks of the Advance Payment phone line opening and more than 100 application packs have been sent out. We have put in place a simple, yet robust application process and are focused on helping survivors and their families through the process.


Current Status: Initiated by the Scottish Government. Answered by John Swinney on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will provide a progress update on the enhancements to the East Kilbride rail corridor.


Answered by Michael Matheson (14/05/2019):

There is continuing growth on the East Kilbride line and some peak journeys on this route regularly appear in the list of top ten overcrowded ScotRail services.

We are making investments now to help with this. Successful electrification of Edinburgh to Glasgow routes now allows the redeployment of diesel trains so ScotRail will provide more than 1,000 extra weekday seats for East Kilbride services from 20 May 2019. However, existing limitations in track layout, capacity and access to stations means there are limits to the length and frequency of trains which can run on this route, and we know that more needs to be done to help make rail travel an attractive choice.

That is why we have now agreed to provide up to £24.8 million to Network Rail to progress the major development work required. This will help determine the right long-term solution and will focus on providing enhanced connectivity (more frequent services), improved accessibility to stations, better transport integration, with improved park and ride facilities and active travel provisions. Our aim, whilst delivering this, is to move towards a carbon free journey from home to destination for communities along the route, by considering electrification.

We anticipate that the development work will take approximately 18 months, with recommendations to the Scottish Government on a package of major infrastructure investment to follow.


Current Status: Initiated by the Scottish Government. Answered by Michael Matheson on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government which NHS boards commission a multidisciplinary tier (a) 3 and (b) 4 weight management service.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (14/05/2019):

The Scottish Government does not hold information about which NHS Boards commission tier 3 and 4 weight management services. It is for NHS Boards to determine what services are required to meet local needs and whether these should be commissioned or delivered directly.

NHS Boards report annually on child and adult weight management services, including tier 3 but there is no requirement to state whether services are commissioned or delivered directly. In terms of tier 4, ISD collects data on the number of bariatric surgeries undertaken annually by NHS Board.

In order to improve quality and equity of access across Scotland, NHS Health Scotland will soon publish minimum standards for child and adult weight management services. Best practice guidance for Tier 4 bariatric provision is already in place.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what additional equipment and financial support or reimbursement is needed for midwives transitioning from acute to community settings under the implementation of the Best Start plan.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (14/05/2019):

NHS staff, maternity and neonatal service users, the NHS, the Royal College of Midwives, the National Childbirth Trust and Bliss, along with others, were instrumental in shaping the five-year plan for maternity and neonatal care. It was as a result of their expert advice that a phased approach is being taken. The initial budget of £12 million is only intended to support the initial phase and we are looking at future funding, recognising that roll out will take several years.

We expect individual Health Boards to meet their responsibility to determine equipment and training needs for their staff. No staff should be financially disadvantaged by moving to the new model of care and we expect all Health Boards to be guided by existing national policy on pay and conditions.

My officials are scoping a pilot project that will offer recently retired professionals the opportunity to work with inexperienced and newly qualified staff to help build confidence and provide support. The project is in the early stages, and will include midwives as the work develops.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 14/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will deliver the Bonn Challenge target of 3,000 to 5,000 hectares of new native woodland planted during 2019-20.


Answered by Fergus Ewing (13/05/2019):

We are making good progress. The official statistics on woodland creation will be published in June 2019.

 


Current Status: Answered by Fergus Ewing on 13/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what information is collected in health assessments for looked after children on the needs of children and young people in relation to mental health and wellbeing.


Answered by Maree Todd (13/05/2019):

The Guidance on Health Assessments for Looked After Children and Young People in Scotland, published in May 2014, details the minimum standardised elements which regional NHS Boards should record as part of the healthcare pathway for a looked after child. It provides a template for the health assessment itself, including details of the specific core data in relation areas such as mental health, which should be recorded. The template is available to view on the Scottish Government website ( Guidance on Health Assessments for Looked After Children in Scotland , Annex A, p35): https://www.gov.scot/publications/guidance-health-assessments-looked-children-scotland/ .


Current Status: Answered by Maree Todd on 13/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of its guidance on health assessments for looked after children, published in May 2014, whether data on looked after children’s health is being collected and collated and, if so, who is undertaking this, and what analysis has been undertaken of the data at a national level in relation to looked after children's mental health and wellbeing.


Answered by Maree Todd (13/05/2019):

The Scottish Government does not collect data at a national level specifically in relation to looked after children's mental health and wellbeing.

The Guidance on Health Assessments for Looked After Children and Young People in Scotland, published in May 2014, was developed to assist those involved in carrying out health assessments of our looked after children and young people by setting out the minimum standardised elements of a health care pathway which Health Boards are expected to implement in collaboration with local authorities and other organisations. Information gathered from health assessments of looked after children and young people is therefore kept at a local level by regional health boards.


Current Status: Answered by Maree Todd on 13/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the eligibility criteria will be for the recently-announced national pilot scheme to provide loans for first-time buyers, including whether these will be available for purchasing all homes or only new-builds, and from what budget line the £150 million required to fund the scheme will be drawn.

 


Answered by Aileen Campbell (13/05/2019):

The Scottish Government will work with stakeholders to fully develop the eligibility criteria for the new scheme. The budget will be funded from financial transactions capital.

Eligible first-time buyers will be able to purchase homes sold on the open market, including new builds. Buyers will be required to fund a minimum of 5% of the value of their new house from their own funds and loans can be up to £25,000.

The scheme will open by the end of the year alongside our existing shared equity schemes to support those who want to buy a home and will help address generational fairness.


Current Status: Answered by Aileen Campbell on 13/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much is spent per person on (a) health, (b) education, (c) transport, (d) policing, public order and safety and (e) housing and community amenities in (i) North Ayrshire, (ii) Inverclyde and (iii) Scotland.


Answered by Derek Mackay (10/05/2019):

Figures for Scotland as a whole are available from HM Treasury’s ‘Country and Regional Analysis: 2018’. Identifiable public expenditure per person in 2017-18 on (a) health and social care, (b) education and training, (c) transport, (d) public order and safety (including policing) and (e) housing and community amenities in Scotland was as follows.

Spend per person on (a) health, (b) education, (c) transport, (d) public order and safety (including policing) and (e) housing and community amenities (£ per person, 2017-18)

 

Scotland

Health and social care

£2,353

Education and training

£1,548

Transport

£667

Public order and safety (including policing)

£497

Housing and community amenities

£365

Source: HM Treasury, Country and Regional Analysis (CRA), 2017-18

Equivalent figures for Scottish local authority areas are not available.

Final, audited figures on local authority expenditure by service is available in the Scottish Local Government Finance Statistics publication, available at https://www2.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Local-Government-Finance/PubScottishLGFStats . It should be noted that these figures only relate to the expenditure by each local authority and exclude any expenditure on these services by central government.


Current Status: Answered by Derek Mackay on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much is spent per person on (a) agriculture, (b) fisheries and (c) forestry in (i) North Ayrshire, (ii) Inverclyde and (iii) Scotland.


Answered by Derek Mackay (10/05/2019):

Figures for Scotland as a whole are available from HM Treasury’s ‘Country and Regional Analysis: 2018’. Identifiable public expenditure per person in 2017-18 on agriculture, fisheries and food and forestry in Scotland was as follows.

Spend per person on (a) agriculture, fisheries and food and (b) forestry (£ per person, 2017-18)

 

Scotland

Agriculture, fisheries and food

£154

Forestry

£14

Source: HM Treasury, Country and Regional Analyses (CRA), 2017-18

The data are not disaggregated by agriculture, fisheries and food sectors individually. Equivalent figures for Scottish local authority areas are not available.


Current Status: Answered by Derek Mackay on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much is spent per person on environmental protection in (a) North Ayrshire, (b) Inverclyde and (c) Scotland.


Answered by Derek Mackay (10/05/2019):

Figures for Scotland as a whole are available from HM Treasury’s ‘Country and Regional Analysis: 2018’. Identifiable public expenditure per person in 2017-18 on environmental protection in Scotland was as follows.

Spend per person on environmental protection (£ per person, 2017-18)

 

Scotland

Environmental protection

£233

Source: HM Treasury, Country and Regional Analysis (CRA), 2017-18

Equivalent figures for Scottish local authority areas are not available.

Final, audited figures on local authority expenditure by service is available in the Scottish Local Government Finance Statistics publication, available at https://www2.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Local-Government-Finance/PubScottishLGFStats . It should be noted that these figures only relate to the expenditure by each local authority and exclude any expenditure on these services by central government.


Current Status: Answered by Derek Mackay on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what scrutiny it undertakes of the operation of Construction Skills Certification Scheme accreditation cards for construction workers.


Answered by Jamie Hepburn (10/05/2019):

The Scottish Government does not operate the Construction Skills Certification Scheme Accreditation Cards.


Current Status: Answered by Jamie Hepburn on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what involvement it has in the running of the Construction Skills Certification Scheme for construction workers.


Answered by Jamie Hepburn (10/05/2019):

The Construction Skills Certification Scheme (CSCS) is a not-for-profit limited company whose directors are from a range of employer organisations and trades unions. CSCS cards provide proof that individuals working on construction sites have the required training and qualifications for the type of work they carry out. Although not a legislative requirement for the industry, Scottish Government policy is that all companies engaged in new public sector construction contracts must ensure that on-site staff are accredited under a competence scheme appropriate for the skills necessary to perform that contract, of which CSCS is one example.


Current Status: Answered by Jamie Hepburn on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many (a) injury and (b) non-injury road accidents on the A90 between Dundee and Stonehaven have been reported in each quarter since 1 April 2016.


Answered by Michael Matheson (10/05/2019):

a) personal injury accidents.

A90 Dundee to Stonehaven Personal Injury Accidents

(Between Emmock roundabout Dundee and where the A957 Slug Road crosses the A90 at Stonehaven)

Year - 2016

Number of Personal Injury Accidents

April – June

5

July – September

3

October – December

7

 

Year - 2017

Number of Personal Injury Accidents

January - March

6

April – June

5

July – September

4

October – December

7

 

Year – 2018*

Number of Personal Injury Accidents

January – March

3

April – June

2

July – September

7

October – December

3

 

Year – 2019**

Number of Personal Injury Accidents

January - March

1

Source: Transport Scotland Accident Manager Database

Date data extracted: 01 May 2019

*This includes data up to 29 December 2018 as we do not hold the full calendar year’s data for Tayside Division of Police Scotland.

**This only includes fatal accidents as this is the only data we hold for this date range at this time.

(b) The Scottish Government does not hold this information centrally. The Scottish Government only holds personal injury accident data.

Please note that the information provided is based on the current figures available. The following are potential reasons for an accident not appearing on our system:

• Transport Scotland only holds accident information which is provided to us by Police Scotland.

• Transport Scotland does not hold information relating to damage only accidents (i.e. not involving an injury).

• Transport Scotland only holds accident information for the trunk road network.

• The accident information Transport Scotland holds is subject to change. E.g. we receive late returns from Police Scotland, who are responsible for recording details of injury accidents.

• Annual Scottish accident figures are published by Transport Scotland on a yearly basis and can be found by entering Reported Road Casualties Scotland into your search engine.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what support it provides for trades people who have difficulty in paying for their Construction Skills Certification Scheme accreditation card.

 


Answered by Jamie Hepburn (10/05/2019):

Skills Development Scotland provides support for individuals to undertake Construction Skills Certification Scheme (CSCS) Training which is necessary to obtain the CSCS accreditation card. This support is offered either through Modern Apprenticeship Frameworks, which in some cases offer a CSCS accreditation card as part of the framework; or through support from Training Providers who, depending on the individuals needs and the accreditation card they require, offer support to obtain a card.


Current Status: Answered by Jamie Hepburn on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what plans it has to establish a women’s health task force.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (10/05/2019):

The Scottish Government is committed to tackling gender inequality in all areas of Scottish life and has continued to invest in women’s health including work on decreasing stillbirth rates, neonatal care and the establishment of endometriosis centres.

The First Minister's National Advisory Council on Women and Girls (the Advisory Council) was formed to address gender inequality and published their first report in January 2019. As part of recent digital engagement a Spotlight on Women and Girl's Health was undertaken, inviting feedback on health related questions. This feedback is currently being analysed and a summary is expected to be published on the Advisory Council's website in June. The responses will provide awareness of current issues and help to inform future reports to the First Minister.

At that point, consideration will be given on how to coordinate activity further on this issue.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-22076 by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 15 March 2019, and in light of the commentary in the report by Auditor General, Social Security: Implementing the devolved powers, which states that Industrial Injuries Disabled Benefit will be delivered by the DWP on an ongoing basis by agency agreement, whether the new claims service for Employment Injury Assistance will be launched in autumn 2022.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (10/05/2019):

Yes.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the expected service delivery date is of the social security advocacy service, and whether the delivery will be aligned with the introduction of disability assistance for children and young people in summer 2020.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (10/05/2019):

The Scottish Government is working towards having the advocacy provision in place for the delivery of the first devolved disability benefits in 2020.

 


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many of its social security (a) programme, (b) directorate and (c) agency staff have previously been employed by the DWP.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (10/05/2019):

The Scottish Government record when an individual joins the organisation from another government department, but not which department it is. It is therefore not possible to report on the number of staff who have previously worked for the Department for Work and Pensions.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the £10 million budgeted in 2019-20 for social security capital expenditure is expected to cover.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (10/05/2019):

The £10 million capital funding in the 2019-20 Social Security Directorate budget is allocated to the development of IT systems.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, if the bidder selected to run the Scottish social security system also provides social security advice, how it will ensure that the advocacy services for the system are (a) delivered, (b) quality assured and (c) audited separately from such advice.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (10/05/2019):

Reporting and operating arrangements would be agreed with the contractor or contractors as part of any procurement process.

 


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what discussions and preparatory work it has conducted with advocacy providers in advance of the publication of the advocacy service for the Scottish social security system prior information notice (PIN) to aid their ability to respond to the PIN.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (10/05/2019):

The Prior Information Notice (PIN) published on 3 April alerted interested parties to the Scottish Government's intention to establish an Advocacy Service for the Scottish Social Security system. Alongside the PIN, the Scottish Government published a "Request For Information" (RFI). The RFI sought information from the advocacy sector around contract options, capacity and outcomes to enable the SG to develop a suitable procurement strategy. Services were able to ask for further information and seek clarity while the RFI was open.

Officials have also been working with advocacy and other third sector organisations around the development of the advocacy service standards required by the Act. At meetings with these organisations, officials outlined the procurement options being considered.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many (a) private, (b) public and (c) third sector organisations have (i) responded to and (ii) requested information regarding the prior information notice for the advocacy service for the Scottish social security system.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (10/05/2019):

Ten third sector organisations responded to the prior information notice/request for information. The number of bodies requesting information cannot be given as the Public Contracts Scotland portal anonymises questions.

 


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the levels of the pollutant, bisphenol A, are at potential point sources such as landfill, sewage and paper sludge and in the wider environment.


Answered by Roseanna Cunningham (10/05/2019):

Further to my answer to S5W-20266 14 December 2018, SEPA have analysed BPA in surface waters since 2007 at over 20 sites. These are prioritised based on populace and inputs from sewage treatment works or denser concentrations of septic tanks. Annual mean concentrations at these sites ranged between 14 and 1150 ng/l, with the majority of the annual means being 50 ng/l or less (278 out of 334). A previous EU Risk Assessment Report for the substance identified a threshold for potential adverse effects in freshwater aquatic life as 15,000ng/l, and as 1500ng/l for marine waters. Based on current available data SEPA determine the risk to aquatic life to be low. Groundwater data at a sample of sites generally associated with industrial activities showed generally no detection of BPA between 2007 and 2018. In relation to potential point sources such as landfill, sewage and paper sludge sites, SEPA holds a limited quantity of sewage and trade effluent monitoring data for BPA. In addition releases of BPA have been reported to the Scottish Pollutant Release Inventory (SPRI) since 2005; these concern releases from sewage treatment works. SEPA do not hold any BPA data for landfill leachates or for sites creating paper sludge effluents. BPA’s use in thermal paper was restricted in the EU from December 2016.

All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Roseanna Cunningham on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it will ensure that the bidder selected to run the advocacy service for the Scottish social security system (a) recruits and (b) trains sufficient numbers of advocates in time for the service go live.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (10/05/2019):

Any procurement process would require bidders to indicate capacity to provide advocacy support and to demonstrate how they would intend to recruit and train staff. This would be assessed as part of tender evaluation.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many teachers have been recruited in each of the last 10 years.


Answered by John Swinney (10/05/2019):

The Scottish Government does not collect data specifically on teacher recruitment. Information is collected and published on teacher numbers through the annual school staff census, this is available on the Scottish Government website at:

https://www2.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/Browse/School-Education/teachcenssuppdata

As part of the school staff census information is collected on the number of probationers and the number of teachers in employment in publicly funded schools in the year following their probation (post-probationers). Teachers can also be recruited having qualified in other countries, from the private sector and from those that had previously left teaching.

 


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much is spent per person on enterprise and economic development in (a) North Ayrshire, (b) Inverclyde and (c) Scotland.


Answered by Derek Mackay (10/05/2019):

Since 2007, the Scottish Government, its enterprise and skills agencies and local authorities have invested significant resources to enable Scotland's economy to thrive and flourish. The specific, extrapolated information requested is not held centrally. Given the contributory funding support provided across a wide range of policy areas, it is not possible to isolate a precise enterprise and economic development element in order to provide the information requested.

Supporting enterprise and economic development is key to the Scottish Government’s mission to drive inclusive economic growth. Specific investments, such as the £1.7 billion committed to City Region and Regional Growth Deals and associated investments, are working in tandem with complementary investment in other areas, including housing, health, education and skills, transport, tourism and culture to secure inclusive growth.

In relation to the Growth Deal programme, North Ayrshire and Inverclyde will benefit from significant levels of fresh investment from the Scottish Government through the Ayrshire Growth Deal and the Glasgow City Region Deal, accounting for a combined investment commitment of £603 million over the next 10-20 years. This catalyst investment will help to realise tangible benefits for people and communities in the form of new jobs and wider economic opportunities.


Current Status: Answered by Derek Mackay on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what plans it has to introduce management and licensing schemes for beavers, in light of their protected status now being in force.


Answered by Roseanna Cunningham (10/05/2019):

Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) has already introduced a management and licensing scheme for beavers, in advance of them being afforded protected status on 1 May 2019.

Details of both schemes can be found on the SNH website at https://www.nature.scot/professional-advice/safeguarding-protected-areas-and-species/protected-species/protected-species-z-guide/protected-species-beaver/management

 


Current Status: Answered by Roseanna Cunningham on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether funding allocated for town centre regeneration can be used for the repair and refurbishment of a pier, where it is integral to the economic viability of the town.


Answered by Derek Mackay (10/05/2019):

The Town Centre Fund is a ring-fenced capital fund for local authorities. An overarching aim of the fund is to contribute to transformative investments which drive local economic activities and re-purpose town centres to become more diverse, successful and sustainable. Capital expenditure can be used for physical infrastructure changes which diversify, regenerate or contribute to the economic development of the town centre.

It is for local authorities to allocate funding, and supporting guidance indicates that it is expected that they make investment decisions in the context of national and local commitments to town centres including the Town Centre First Principle and Town Centre Action Plan; and, more recently, the Place Principle. These decisions should be based on an understanding of town centre performance and ownership, shared visions and plans with local communities, partners and stakeholders fully engaged; and, identification of physical infrastructure changes that will contribute to achieving those visions. In this context, in some towns this could therefore include the repair or refurbishment of a pier.


Current Status: Answered by Derek Mackay on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many units have been constructed with support from the Scotland Self-Build Loan Fund, and what plans it has to expand the fund. 


Answered by Kevin Stewart (10/05/2019):

To date, 14 homes have been constructed with support from the Self Build Loan Fund pilot in the Highland Council area. Fund administrators, The Highlands Small Communities Housing Trust, has approved two loans from the national fund to a value of £265,000 and is currently considering a further eight applications with a loan value of £935,000.

Following feedback from applicants and to stimulate uptake of the fund, we have recently amended the fund criteria to allow current homeowners to apply to the fund and have removed the requirement to repay the loan with a mortgage.


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on placing a statutory duty on local authorities to maintain a register of people and groups that have acquired service plots for self-build homes and for the councils to employ a named officer to take such interests forward, including by ensuring that there are enough plots to meet expected demand.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (10/05/2019):

The Scottish Government has no plans to place a statutory duty on local authorities to maintain a register of people and groups that have acquired service plots for self-build homes. We support self-build and want to see this sector grow, providing more options for people to own their own home across Scotland. We are supporting the development of an online resource, Scotland's Self and Custom Build Portal , through funding from the Self and Custom Build Challenge Fund. The portal includes a plot finder function which lists sites suitable for self and custom build projects across Scotland.

It is for Councils to determine if they wish to employ a named officer to take forward local interests in self build including facilitating access to suitable serviced plots.


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-19969 by Jeane Freeman on 16 November 2018, whether it will provide an update on the progress that is being made with the integrated health and social care workforce plan.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (10/05/2019):

Progress is continuing on a fully integrated National Health and Social Care Integrated Workforce Plan, setting out our priorities for the health and social care workforce Scotland will require for the future. As with the previous three parts of the National Plan, we are working with stakeholders to ensure their views are fully and carefully considered and reflected. The Integrated Plan is being co-produced and will be jointly published with COSLA later this year.

 


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what investment in has made in the fashion and textiles industry since 2007-08.


Answered by Jamie Hepburn (10/05/2019):

Support for the fashion and textiles industry in Scotland is provided by Scottish Enterprise, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and Creative Scotland and is, therefore, an operational matter for those agencies. I have asked their Chief Executives to respond to you directly.

 


Current Status: Answered by Jamie Hepburn on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-20098 by John Swinney on 4 December 2018, in light of the cabinet secretary's comment that he had "paused the publication of the revised presumption of mainstreaming guidance and research into the experiences of children receiving additional support for learning...to enable further reflection...of the report Not Included, Not Engaged, Not Involved: A report on the experiences of autistic children missing school", for what reason the recently published, Guidance on the presumption to provide education in a mainstream setting, does not make reference to that report.


Answered by John Swinney (10/05/2019):

The Guidance on the presumption to provide education in a mainstream setting was informed by a wide range of information and evidence including the Not Included, Not Engaged and Not Involved report. The guidance takes account of the matters raised in the report, and these are framed within the advice and guidance to schools and education authorities in relation to the implementation of the presumption to mainstream education. The document therefore focusses on the legislative and practice requirements, for pupils with additional support needs and particularly highlights the need to focus on the individual needs of pupils. This is consistent with the recommendations of the Not Included, Not Engaged and Not Involved report.

In addition, and as part of our wider response to the Not Included, Not Engaged and Not Involved report the Scottish Government has convened a short life working group to consider Autism in schools. The group includes a wide range of stakeholders and the conclusions of the group will be made public in due course.

 


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 10/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action it takes to promote the benefits of quality home economics education to headteachers and education managers.


Answered by John Swinney (09/05/2019):

STEM Bursary Scheme The Scottish Government has included home economics in the STEM bursary scheme which allows students to obtain a bursary of £20,000 to study for a PGDE in home economics. Home economics is the only subject in the curriculum which can address issues around food in the twenty first century and give young people the knowledge, skills, capabilities and attributes they need to make informed, healthy food choices now and in the future.

Scottish Government has worked with GTCS and Initial Teacher Education Establishments to promote Home Economics as a viable career pathway and to increase significantly the number of Home Economics PGDE places available for students as an emerging trend of alternative routes into teaching.

Scottish Government working with Education Scotland has promoted the bursary scheme through the Home Economics Lead Officer (HELO) network who have direct links to Head Teachers and Education Managers. This network is key to the promotion of Home Economics in Scottish schools with the intention of increasing the number of Home Economics teachers across Scotland over the next few years.

Food for Thought Fund 2012 – 2021

The Food for Thought Fund gives financial support to develop food and health as a context for learning. The fund aims to improve practitioner confidence in providing progressive, high quality, skills based learning experiences which help to embed food education into the ethos of the establishment.

Through Food for Thought funding we are inviting practitioners and school leaders to make the most of the opportunities that exist and to take forward actions that a lack of resources had previously inhibited.


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what guidance it provides regarding stages of cooking skill progression as part of home economics education to ensure that pupils learn new skills every year.


Answered by John Swinney (09/05/2019):

Curriculum for Excellence outlines the entitlement for children and young people to experience a number of Broad General Education Experiences and Outcomes from 3-15 education beginning at early learning and child care stage and continuing through primary school right up to S4-S6.

Benchmarks make clear what learners need to know and be able to do to progress through the levels, and to support consistency in teachers’ and other practitioners’ professional judgements .

Food education permeates every area of the curriculum and is a great context for real life learning. Learning to cook is a skill for life. The Good Food Skills resource supports practitioners with information & activities in relation to the classroom management and teaching of practical food education and skills from early level to fourth level. The importance of Home Economics teachers within secondary schools should be emphasised in relation to building on prior learning from primary school experiences, and teaching combined health, nutrition and practical skills.

The resource will build knowledge and understanding appropriate for every level and offers a skills progression framework with suggested recipes which match the skill set of learners at every level. This will ensure highly effective teaching & learning experiences for children and young people relating to practical food education.


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many nurseries in each local authority area have been (a) built, (b) expanded and (c) refurbished in each year since 2016.


Answered by Maree Todd (09/05/2019):

Scottish Futures Trust have been tracking Local Authorities Early Learning and Childcare (ELC) infrastructure capital projects on behalf of the Scottish Government ELC expansion programme since August 2017. This coincides with the first allocation of capital funding to local authorities to support the expansion to 1140 hours, which was provided for the 2017-18 financial year.

Authority

Refurb
‎ Complete

Extension
‎ Complete

New Build
‎ Complete

Aberdeen City

0

0

0

Aberdeenshire

0

0

0

Angus

1

0

0

Argyll & Bute

1

1

0

Clackmannanshire

1

0

1

D&G

4

0

0

Dundee

1

0

0

East Ayrshire

0

1

1

East Dunbartonshire

0

0

1

East Lothian

4

0

1

East Renfrewshire

0

1

0

Edinburgh

3

0

0

Eilean Siar

0

2

0

Falkirk

8

0

0

Fife

2

1

1

Glasgow

3

0

0

Highland

9

1

1

Inverclyde

3

0

1

Midlothian

0

0

1

Moray

1

0

0

North Ayrshire

9

1

0

North Lanarkshire

1

0

0

Orkney

5

0

0

Perth and Kinross

0

0

3

Renfrewshire

2

0

1

Scottish Borders

4

1

0

Shetland

1

0

0

South Ayrshire

2

1

0

South Lanarkshire

0

0

0

Stirling

5

1

0

West Dunbartonshire

2

0

0

West Lothian

0

1

1

Scotland

72

12

13

 


Current Status: Answered by Maree Todd on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what guidance it provides regarding the teaching of nutrition and healthy food preparation as part of home economics education in schools.


Answered by John Swinney (09/05/2019):

Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) provides a broad set of national guidance to support schools in developing their curriculum. However, the specific content of teaching programme is decided by schools and local authorities in order to meet children’s and young people’s needs at local level.

Guidance on teaching of Nutrition and healthy eating comes under Food and Health in the Health and Wellbeing Experiences and Outcomes of Curriculum for Excellence beginning in Early Years, continuing through primary school and delivered predominantly via Home Economics in secondary schools. The Health and Wellbeing Experience’s and outcomes and Benchmarks are a set of clear and concise statements about children's learning and progression in each subject area, including Food and Health/Home Economics. They are used to help plan learning and to assess progress.

https://education.gov.scot/Documents/health-and-wellbeing-eo.pdf .


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it is involved in any contingency plan discussions regarding the potential eviction of hundreds of people from asylum accommodation in Glasgow, in light of the Court of Session decision on 12 April 2019 in the so-called "lock change" case against Serco and the Home Office.


Answered by Aileen Campbell (09/05/2019):

The Scottish Government is not directly involved in discussions between the Home Office, Serco and Glasgow City Council about next steps following the judgement in the Court of Session. However, I have written to the Immigration Minister, the Chief Executive of Serco and the Leader of Glasgow City Council to seek information about the current position and contingency planning.


Current Status: Answered by Aileen Campbell on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what protocols are in place to ensure that the correct procedures are followed when treating people with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) who are at risk of allergic reactions, including those who have recorded an antibody build up during enzyme replacement therapy.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (09/05/2019):

There are established guidelines for identification and reduction of allergic reactions throughout Medical services to minimise risk. Protocols include seeking a history of allergy before medical interventions at risk of producing an allergy.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it allocated the £2 billion that it received from the UK Government to mark the 70th anniversary of the NHS.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (09/05/2019):

It is essential that the UK Government delivers the £2 billion funding commitment in full, and it is concerning that the commitment has already been reduced by £55 million on a recurring basis. In addition the UK Government has not provided clarity on funding beyond 2019-20, leaving open the possibility of further reductions in the funding commitment.

The Health and Social Care Medium Term Financial Framework confirms that health resource consequentials will continue to be passed on in full. The Framework sets out a proposal that would take total spending across health and care to £18.8 billion by 2023-24, and provides detail on how this funding will be used to deliver better services, better care and better value.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its assessment is of the impact of Brexit on the hospitality industry.


Answered by Fiona Hyslop (09/05/2019):

The impact of Brexit on Scotland’s hospitality industry could be extremely damaging, particularly in relation to the movement of people. EU nationals form a significant, and highly valued, part of our tourism sector’s workforce. It is established that 24000 of those employed in the Tourism sector are EU Nationals making up 13% of all those employed in the sector. The UK Government's potential approach to migration will affect the tourism and hospitality industry much more severely than some other industries and parts of the UK. Tourism has a reach across Scotland unlike any other sector, and is vital to many communities. Workers from the EU play a key role in maintaining and promoting everything Scotland has to offer to the world.

 


Current Status: Answered by Fiona Hyslop on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what plans it has to carry out awareness-raising activities in respect of the question on the Scots language in the 2021 census.


Answered by John Swinney (09/05/2019):

The Scottish Government has provided funding to the Scots Language Centre to research and develop a strategy for delivering a refreshed online campaign supporting the Scots language questions in the 2021 census.

The Scots Language Centre has begun discussions with stakeholders with the purpose of gathering information about Scots in the census and making this widely available via a dedicated section on their website. The SLC has also started the process of auditing existing information provision and working with Scottish Government officials and stakeholders on developing plans for an awareness raising campaign in advance of the census in 2021. We will consider the topical needs of core audiences and seek to identify the most effective routes to meeting these.

In the meantime, Scottish Government policy officials and the Scots Language Centre continue to work with the NRS to develop their guidance for the Scots question to ensure greater public understanding of term Scots language.


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much it estimates it will cost in directly foregone tax revenue if Air Departure Tax was implemented on the basis of a 50% reduction on the current level of Air Passenger Duty.


Answered by Kate Forbes (09/05/2019):

Following the First Minister’s declaration of a climate emergency - and the decision to propose new emissions reduction targets for Scotland - the Scottish Government is committed to looking across our whole range of responsibilities and increasing action where necessary.

While the Scottish Government remains committed to taking on Air Departure Tax (ADT), we have taken the difficult decision that reducing the tax is no longer compatible with our new emissions reduction targets.

The Scottish Government welcomes the efforts of Scotland’s tourism sector and aviation industry to reduce carbon emissions and will continue work with them to support the sector in a sustainable way.


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what percentage of pupils meet the national satisfactory standards in (a) reading, (b) writing, (c) listening and talking and (d) numeracy, also broken down by the percentage in the (i) Aberdeen City, (ii) best performing and (iii) worst performing council area.


Answered by John Swinney (09/05/2019):

The annual Achievement of Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) return collects data relating to all pupils in Primary 1, Primary 4, Primary 7 and Secondary 3. This return measures performance in aspects of literacy and numeracy, and reports on the proportion of pupils who have achieved the expected CfE level based on teacher professional judgements. The latest data is available in the National Improvement Framework Interactive Evidence Report .

The percentage of primary pupils achieving the expected CfE level relevant for their stage

 

Reading

Writing

Listening and talking

Numeracy

Scotland

79.1

74.3

85.2

78.4

Aberdeen City

78.0

73.9

85.7

77.7

The percentage of of pupils achieving CfE third level or better in S3

 

Reading

Writing

Listening and talking

Numeracy

Scotland

90.0

89.0

91.2

89.0

Aberdeen City

84.6

81.8

85.1

84.1

The data for all other local authorities in Scotland is not ranked and can be found by following the link above.


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what progress each local authority is making with the Housing First programme.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (09/05/2019):

At the end of March 2019 a total of 56 Housing First tenancies had started across the five pathfinder cities participating in the programme.

Pathfinder City

Number of Housing First Tenancies

Aberdeen / Shire

5

Dundee

7

Edinburgh

12

Glasgow

29

Stirling

3

 


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how its energy efficiency measures are impacting on fuel poverty.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (09/05/2019):

The Scottish Government is providing energy efficiency measures to help those families living in or at risk of living in fuel poverty in Scotland through its Home Energy Efficiency Programme for Scotland (HEEPS).

Launched in April 2013 the HEEPS programme is made up of 3 separate schemes and provides an offer of support to all households in Scotland. The three schemes are;

HEEPS: Area Based Schemes (ABS ) are delivered by local authorities who target fuel poor areas and provide a range of insulation measures while focusing on harder to treat properties requiring more expensive measures such as solid wall insulation.

HEEPS: Warmer Homes Scotland (WHS) is the national fuel poverty scheme providing fabric measures such as insulation as well as heating measures to improve the energy efficiency of the Scottish housing stock as well as to sustainably reduce fuel bills for those people who are deemed to be living in or at risk of living in fuel poverty.

HEEPS: Loans . Through Home Energy Scotland (HES) loans of up to £10,000 are available to all households (HES Loans) and registered social landlords (RSL Loans) to help them install energy efficiency measures in to their properties. The loans are interest free and applicants for HES Loans have also benefited from cashback. These loans are not limited to fuel poor households as anyone can apply for them.

Due to the nature of the factors that contribute to a household being in fuel poverty it is not possible to establish with any certainty the impact that these schemes have had on the levels of fuel poverty in Scotland. However, the Scottish Government has calculated the average annual savings on fuel for households benefitting from interventions under HEEPS. In the financial year 2017-18 the average annual fuel bill savings for each household receiving help under one of the HEEPS schemes were:

  • HEEPS: ABS £293.00
  • HEEPS: WHS £318.00
  • HES: HES Loans £195.00
  • HEEPS: RSL Loans £221.00

The 2017-18 HEEPS Delivery Report is due to be published in the next few weeks. The 2016-17 HEEPS Delivery Report can be found on the Scottish Government Website at https://www.gov.scot/publications/home-energy-efficiency-programmes-scotland-delivery-report-2016-17/ .


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the average number of subjects taken by S4 students at Ardrossan Academy has been in each of the last 10 years.


Answered by John Swinney (09/05/2019):

The Scottish Government do not hold data on the number of subjects taken by pupils in individual Scottish schools. The following table shows the average number of entries into SQA Qualifications per S4 pupil at Ardrossan Academy, from 2009 to 2018. This does not include pupils who take SQA qualifications over two years as they would not be entered into the qualification in S4.

Exam Result Year

Average number of entries

2009

6.8

2010

8.1

2011

7.7

2012

8.0

2013

7.9

2014

7.4

2015

7.6

2016

8.6

2017

8.1

2018

6.8

Notes:

1. SQA Qualifications included in the calculation for Ardrossan Academy are: National Qualifications (e.g. National 5, Higher, etc.), Standard Grades, Awards and Skills for Work. All SQA course qualifications were taken into account in the calculation, however Ardrossan Academy had only these four Qualification types. Qualifications across all SCQF Levels have been counted.


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what steps it is taking to measure the success of the Housing First approach, and what discussions it has had with (a) local authorities, (b) the third sector and (c) housing providers to help ensure the success of the approach.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (09/05/2019):

The Housing First Pathfinder Programme is a partnership between the Scottish Government, Corra Foundation, Glasgow Homelessness Network and Social Bite.

Heriot Watt University have been appointed to undertake a full and independent evaluation of the Housing First Pathfinder Programme. This will include participation from across each of the local authorities involved, front line service providers including third sector organisations, and also service users. In addition Glasgow Homelessness Network are publishing a monthly tenancy tracker to chart progress and high level outcomes. The tracker is published monthly at: http://www.ghn.org.uk/shien/housing-first/housing-first-tracker/ .


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government when ministers last visited the construction site of ferry vessels 801 and 802.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (09/05/2019):

Scottish Ministers and officials have held a number of meetings with Ferguson Marine Engineering Limited, Caledonian Maritime Assets Ltd, and union representatives of the workforce on this issue in the past month. These have been off site at this time. In addition, Scottish Government independently appointed advisers have also been undertaking regular meetings at the ship yard.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-22255 by John Swinney on 27 March 2019, for what reason Education Scotland has published resources linking the history of the transatlantic slave trade to modern human trafficking.


Answered by John Swinney (09/05/2019):

As set out in the answer to S5W-21243 on 5 February 2019, the “People, Past Events and Societies” element of the curriculum provides teachers with the flexibility to choose topics which meet the needs of their pupils and this can include learning and teaching about the transatlantic slave trade. The educational resources referred to in the previous answer included issues relating to human trafficking and exploitation today as well as the transatlantic slave trade in order to help young people understand that lessons from the past are not always learned from in society today and that people of all races and genders are still exploited in our modern world. Education Scotland provide such resources to support teachers in helping pupils develop a balanced and informed understanding of past people and events, their impact on how our society has developed and lessons for our future. It is up to teachers to decide whether and how to use these resources in their learning and teaching.

All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many people were members of the P1 Practitioner Forum, also broken down by how many were P1 teachers in (a) 2017-18 only, (b) 2018-19 only and (c) both 2017-18 and 2018-19.


Answered by John Swinney (09/05/2019):

The invitation to join the Forum was sent to more than 30 staff from schools, local authorities, Professional Associations, Education Scotland and the Universities. The Forum requested that individuals had experience of doing, managing or advising on the P1 assessments. The Scottish Government did not collect data on which academic year teachers taught P1 children but on how many years teaching experience they had. This information is published in the P1 Practitioner Forum: Group Profile - h ttps://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/participation-group-profile.pdf .


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether people with addiction will qualify for the Housing First programmes.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (09/05/2019):

The Housing First approach ensures those with multiple and complex needs are allocated settled accommodation with the intensive support they may need, individually tailored and provided to them in these mainstream tenancies, rather than through supported accommodation to develop 'tenancy readiness'. Typically an individual who has addictions issues would qualify.


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will publish the questionnaire that was used to compile the information in the paper, P1 Practitioner Forum: Group Profile, and whether it will place in the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) details of the questionnaire returns, broken down by how many were completed by (a) members of organisations that are allied to schools, (b) school management staff, (c) P1 teachers in (i) 2017-18 and (ii) 2018-19 and (d) academics.


Answered by John Swinney (09/05/2019):

A questionnaire was not undertaken. Individual profile sheets were completed by Forum members and this information was analysed and summarised anonymously into the P1 Practitioner Forum: Group Profile. The individuals who completed these profile sheets did so on the basis that they would remain anonymous.


Current Status: Answered by John Swinney on 09/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-21125 by Christina McKelvie on 25 January 2019, on what date it will publish outcomes from the Race Equality Conference and the final report on Year 1 Race Equality Actions.


Answered by Christina McKelvie (08/05/2019):

The Race Equality Action Plan Year 1 Actions Report with a summary of discussion from the end of year event will be published on gov.scot on 24 June 2019.


Current Status: Answered by Christina McKelvie on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it plans to consider the applicability of recommendations from the review of England's cancer screening programmes to help improve similar services in Scotland.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (08/05/2019):

The review of England’s cancer screening was commissioned by NHS England and is expected to culminate in recommendations about future commissioning and delivery of cancer screening programmes in England. The independent review is being conducted by Professor Sir Mike Richards and is expected to report in Summer 2019. The Scottish Government has not had any direct involvement in the review of England's cancer screening.

The Scottish Government is advised on all aspects of screening by the UK National Screening Committee (UK NSC) and the Scottish Screening Committee. Both Committees will consider any recommendations which come from the review, and advise Scottish Government on any implications for cancer screening services in Scotland.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what conditions are attached to the £30 million that has been provided by the Building Scotland Fund to the property group, Sigma.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (08/05/2019):

The £30m is a commercial loan between Scottish Ministers, via the Building Scotland Fund, and a Sigma Capital Group company. Key aspects of its design are that:

  • The loan is a revolving credit facility.
  • The loan is interest-bearing and repayable on commercial terms.
  • The completed properties will be used for private rent and professionally managed by Sigma.
  • The finance will help deliver up to 1,800 new homes for private rent across Scotland.
  • Scottish Government has the appropriate financial and commercial controls to ensure that these homes are delivered in line with the terms of the agreement.

Further details are considered commercially confidential and I am therefore unable to provide additional information on the individual terms of this agreement.


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what consideration it has given to the role of the mental function champions in developing disability assistance assessments.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (08/05/2019):

The Scottish Government will ensure that all assessors are suitably qualified to carry out their role, with a proportion of assessors specifically trained in the impact of mental health conditions. Specialist Advisors will also be available to provide information and advice to Case Managers on matters which require specific input, including in relation to mental health. Our approach to assessments is explained in the consultation which can be found through the following link:  https://consult.gov.scot/social-security/improving-disability-assistance/ .


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government by what date it will launch the consultation for the Circular Economy Bill.


Answered by Roseanna Cunningham (08/05/2019):

We are committed to developing Scotland’s circular economy, as set out in our strategy document Making Things Last . Taking a more circular approach to the use and reuse of materials and circular business models can help protect the environment, and deliver social and economic benefits to our communities. The Scottish Government will announce its plans for future legislative programmes in due course.


Current Status: Answered by Roseanna Cunningham on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what involvement it has had in the review of England's cancer screening programme and how it will use opportunities to learn lessons from its recommendations.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (08/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-22908 on 8 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-22254 by Christina McKelvie on 28 March 2019, for what reason it has decided not to quantify the historic implications of slavery for Scotland as a whole, and whether it will encourage other public bodies to carry out this work.


Answered by Christina McKelvie (08/05/2019):

Whilst we are determined to learn from our past and the role Scotland played in the Transatlantic Slave Trade, our efforts at the present time are focused on ensuring we deliver positive outcomes for the minority ethnic people of Scotland now. This work is being carried out through the Race Equality Action Plan and Race Equality Framework which sets out our approach to promoting race equality and tackling racism and inequality between 2016 and 2030.


Current Status: Answered by Christina McKelvie on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many incidents of double and pavement parking have been recorded in (a) Glasgow, (b) Edinburgh, and (c) Aberdeen in each of the last five years.


Answered by Michael Matheson (08/05/2019):

The Scottish Government does not hold information on the number of incidents of double and pavement parking as this is a matter for Glasgow, Edinburgh and Aberdeen City Councils.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it balances the stewardship of important archaeological sites in the care of Historic Environment Scotland and the importance of access to those sites for visitors at sites such as Jarlshof in Shetland, and therefore, for what reason it has not yet responded to the Member's letter of 4 March 2019 on this issue, and whether it considers this acceptable.


Answered by Fiona Hyslop (08/05/2019):

Policy for properties in care is predicated on delivering Scottish Ministers’ priorities for the historic environment in Scotland. These priorities include contribution to Scotland’s intellectual, economic and social wellbeing, both now and in the future and in particular, public access, engagement and education.

The stewardship of archaeological sites in the care of the Scottish Government is delegated to Historic Environment Scotland (HES). Scotland’s strategy, Our Place in Time, sets out how greater access to and interpretation and understanding of the significance of the historic environment is being encouraged.

I have responded to the Member's letter about Jarlshof and apologies for the delay. The letter details further that there are important value for money considerations about the proposals.


Current Status: Answered by Fiona Hyslop on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on introducing an ID card for young carers, primarily to assist with collecting from pharmacies.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (08/05/2019):

The Scottish Government supported piloting of young carer identification cards in six local authority areas in 2012. Based on the learning from these pilots, we offered all local authorities one-off grant funding to establish similar cards and recommended the ongoing costs were covered through previous Carer Information Strategy funding. It was made clear that this was a local decision. Some areas decided not to establish a card because of concerns they would be stigmatising.

The Royal Pharmaceutical Society has published guidance in its Medicines, Ethics and Practice professional guide for pharmacists about children collecting medicines from a pharmacy, with one consideration being that the child may be a young carer: https://www.rpharms.com/resources/quick-reference-guides/children-collecting-medicines-from-a-pharmacy .


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-22274 by Roseanna Cunningham on 3 April 2019, what monitoring it has undertaken to determine whether agri-environment delivery has been effective for waders, including the curlew, and what further such monitoring it has planned.


Answered by Roseanna Cunningham (08/05/2019):

Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) will shortly be letting a contract, on behalf of the Scottish Government, to evaluate the Biodiversity outcomes of the 2014-20 SRDP Agri-Environment Climate Scheme (AECS). This will be undertaken through a selection of case studies and will analyse the geographical spread and uptake of AECS options through contracts awarded so far. Some of the AECS options selected will be those benefitting farmland waders.

The project will provide a qualitative assessment of a selection of AECS case study farms (between 30 and 40 across Scotland) to contribute to the assessment of AECS performance. The farm assessments will involve some field survey work and farmer interviews to understand their experience of implementing their contract and the benefits it has generated. The project is expected to report by the end of this financial year.

In addition, SNH’s Working for Waders project has undertaken two projects to help inform actions for farmland waders, including those supported by AECS. One is the preparation of wader hotspot maps to illustrate the distribution and population change of farmland wading birds in Scotland and to identify geographic patterns of changing abundance. The second is the preparation of wader fieldwork guidance to help a range of people count and monitor waders. The latter guidance is being used by groups of farmers involved in local Working for Waders supported projects (primarily resourced through AECS) which have been and are continuing to monitor waders. These projects include the RSPB-led Clyde Valley project and the Strathspey Waders and Wetland Initiative.


Current Status: Answered by Roseanna Cunningham on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what steps it is taking to support housing associations in accessing lending for affordable housing and housing for social rent.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (08/05/2019):

Scottish Government officials regularly meet with lenders in Scotland to discuss housing market issues, including appetite for lending to individuals and to organisations.

Through the delivery of our ambitious 50,000 affordable homes target, officials also regularly meet with developing housing associations and other partners, including housing sector representative bodies such as the Scottish Federation of Housing Associations, to discuss and monitor delivery of affordable and social housing across Scotland.

The Affordable Housing Supply Programme also provides direct support for housing associations through Charitable Bonds, an innovative investment product which creates loan funding and is available to housing associations for the provision of affordable housing.


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many households in each local authority area are experiencing fuel poverty.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (08/05/2019):

The number of households in each local authority that are experiencing fuel poverty is published annually in the Scottish House Condition Survey local authority tables. The most recent set of these tables covered the 3-year period from 2015-2017 and were published in February 2019. The following table shows the overall number and rate of fuel poor households in each local authority over the 2015-2017 period.

These estimates are based on the current definition of fuel poverty as set out in the 2002 Scottish Fuel Poverty Statement. There are proposed changes to this definition in the Fuel Poverty (Target, Definition and Strategy) (Scotland) Bill , which is currently progressing through Parliament.

Published Local Authority estimates are available here: https://www2.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/SHCS/keyanalyses/LATables1517

Table: Number of fuel poor households in each local authority, 2015-2017

Local Authority

Number of fuel poor households (000’s)

% of households that are fuel poor

Aberdeen City

22

21%

Aberdeenshire

41

37%

Angus

18

33%

Argyll and Bute

18

44%

Clackmannanshire

7

31%

Dumfries and Galloway

26

36%

Dundee City

22

31%

East Ayrshire

17

32%

East Dunbartonshire

11

23%

East Lothian

11

25%

East Renfrewshire

8

21%

Edinburgh, City of

39

17%

Na h-Eileanan Siar

7

56%

Falkirk

16

22%

Fife

52

31%

Glasgow City

61

21%

Highland

53

49%

Inverclyde

11

31%

Midlothian

8

22%

Moray

18

42%

North Ayrshire

17

26%

North Lanarkshire

36

24%

Orkney Islands

6

57%

Perth and Kinross

21

30%

Renfrewshire

19

23%

Scottish Borders

17

31%

Shetland Islands

5

44%

South Ayrshire

15

29%

South Lanarkshire

33

23%

Stirling

10

26%

West Dunbartonshire

9

22%

West Lothian

16

21%

Scotland

670

27%

Source: Scottish House Condition Survey, 2015-2017.

Local Authority

Number of fuel poor households (000’s)

% of households in local authority that are fuel poor

 

Aberdeen City

22

21%

 

Aberdeenshire

41

37%

 

Angus

18

33%

 

Argyll and Bute

18

44%

 

Clackmannanshire

7

31%

 

Dumfries and Galloway

26

36%

 

Dundee City

22

31%

 

East Ayrshire

17

32%

 

East Dunbartonshire

11

23%

 

East Lothian

11

25%

 

East Renfrewshire

8

21%

 

Edinburgh, City of

39

17%

 

Na h-Eileanan Siar

7

56%

 

Falkirk

16

22%

 

Fife

52

31%

 

Glasgow City

61

21%

 

Highland

53

49%

 

Inverclyde

11

31%

 

Midlothian

8

22%

 

Moray

18

42%

 

North Ayrshire

17

26%

 

North Lanarkshire

36

24%

 

Orkney Islands

6

57%

 

Perth and Kinross

21

30%

 

Renfrewshire

19

23%

 

Scottish Borders

17

31%

 

Shetland Islands

5

44%

 

South Ayrshire

15

29%

 

South Lanarkshire

33

23%

 

Stirling

10

26%

 

West Dunbartonshire

9

22%

 

West Lothian

16

21%

 

Scotland

670

27%

 

Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many people in each of the last five years have been classified as having a severe food allergy.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (08/05/2019):

This information is not held centrally. Information on patients who have been admitted to hospital as an emergency due to food allergies and the number of deaths due to food allergies in the last five years is available in response to S5W-22860 on 8 May 2019.

All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it ensures that abortion care meets the needs of women who are disabled, have ME or are refugees, and LGBTI people, as recommended in the Engender report, Our Bodies, Our Rights.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (08/05/2019):

The Scottish Government believes all women in Scotland should have access to clinically safe and legal abortion services, within the limits that are currently set down in law, should they require it. It is our view that abortion care should be part of standard healthcare provisions, free from stigma. We continue to work with NHS boards on the provision and further improvement of abortion services across Scotland.

The Scottish Government is committed to ensuring that abortion services in Scotland are all-inclusive and accessible to all individuals, regardless of disabilities, age, gender, sexual orientation and ethnicity. Services should meet the needs of individuals in a person-centred and respectful way.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what options have been explored to close the 2021 landfill capacity gap through waste prevention.


Answered by Roseanna Cunningham (08/05/2019):

We are examining options to address the landfill capacity shortfall which has been identified in the recently published waste markets study.

Waste prevention is high on the Scottish Government's priorities and this is why we have introduced an ambitious food waste prevention target to reduce all food waste arising by 33% by 2025. In addition, the Food Waste Reduction Action Plan published in April 2019 calls for coordinated action across all sectors.

Other options to help support progress towards achieving our targets include the Waste Prevention Implementation Fund which is available to small or medium sized enterprises through Zero Waste Scotland. It is recognised that while organisations understand the benefits of waste prevention, they often do not take action, lacking the finance and support to make the necessary changes. The Investment Fund has been designed to help organisations overcome these barriers to undertake a particular project with a focus on raw materials savings, carbon savings and the movement of waste material up the waste hierarchy.


Current Status: Answered by Roseanna Cunningham on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much has been spent in each of the last five years on (a) routine and (b) emergency treatment on people with a food allergy.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (08/05/2019):

This is a matter for individual Health Boards. The information requested is not held centrally by the Scottish Government.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many people in each of the last five years have (a) received emergency treatment for and (b) died as a result of a food allergy.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (08/05/2019):

Most emergency treatment for food allergies is provided in a primary care or emergency department setting and information on this specific activity is not centrally held.

The number of patients who have been admitted to hospital as an emergency due to food allergies and the number of deaths due to food allergies in the last five years are shown in the following two tables.

Table 1. Patients admitted to hospital as an emergency due to a diagnosis of food allergy; NHS Scotland; 2014–18.


Year

Patients

2014

432

2015

367

2016

372

2017

401

2018

357

Source: SMR01

Data extracted: May 2019

Table 2. Deaths where food allergy was recorded as an underlying or contributing cause of death; 2013-17 1

Year

Patients

2013

0

2014

0

2015

1

2016

0

2017

0

 

Source: National Records of Scotland (NRS)

Data extracted: May 2019

 

1. Data for calendar year 2018 has not yet been published by NRS.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it has any plans to deliver Universal Credit Scottish Choices through Social Security Scotland, rather than the DWP.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (08/05/2019):

Universal Credit (UC) is a benefit over which powers are reserved to the UK Government. The Scotland Act 2016 devolved powers to Scottish Ministers to determine to whom and when Universal Credit is paid in Scotland, but delivery of UC remains the responsibility of the Department for Work and Pensions.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what the satisfaction rate is among Universal Credit (UC) Scottish Choices claimants compared with those in receipt of monthly UC housing element payments.


Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville (08/05/2019):

The take-up rate of the Universal Credit (UC) Scottish choices has been high. Over the period 11 November 2017 to end August 2018, 66,700 people had been offered the UC Scottish choices, and around 32,000 people (almost 50%) took up one or both of the choices.


Current Status: Answered by Shirley-Anne Somerville on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what involvement it has in the establishment of regulatory standards and processes in relation to the rollout of 5G technology.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (08/05/2019):

Legislative and regulatory powers regarding telecommunications are currently reserved to the UK Government under the policy reservation provisions of the Scotland Act (1998).

As such, the Scottish Government has no direct locus in the establishment of regulatory standards and processes in relation to the rollout of 5G technology. More generally, the day to day regulation of telecommunications is the responsibility of the UK telecommunications regulator, Ofcom.

Scottish Ministers and our officials do have regular engagement with Ofcom and seek to try to positively influence their policies, and those of UK Ministers, to try to ensure they work in the interests of Scottish consumers.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many bone marrow transplants for people with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) in each of the last 10 years have led to significant complications (a) during and (b) after the procedure, broken down by NHS board.

 

 


Answered by Jeane Freeman (08/05/2019):

Based on data provided to the Information Services Division of NHS Scotland, less than 5 patients in Scotland with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) who received a bone marrow transplant had a reported diagnosis of bone-marrow transplant rejection between April 2006 and March 2018. It is not possible to break the information down further because the small number of patients carries the risk that in doing so individuals are identified. Data is held by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde which hosts the designated paediatric Stem Cell Transplantation Unit and is also recognised as the lead paediatric centre for Inherited Metabolic Disorders (IMD) in Scotland.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its response is to the significant decrease in the number of people from Scotland aged 16 to 24 who self-assessed as having good or very good health, according to the Scottish Core Questions Survey 2017.


Answered by Clare Haughey (08/05/2019):

We have noted this decrease in self-reported wellbeing. Evidence suggests that the underlying causes are an increasing proportion of this age group reporting long-term conditions and lower levels of mental wellbeing.

Mental health is an absolute priority for this Government. We have put in place a ten year strategy to improve access to mental health services, backed by an additional £150 million over five years. Additionally, the 2018-19 Programme for Government has mental health at its very heart. It contains a package of measures to support positive mental health and prevent ill health. These new actions build on the Mental Health Strategy and will be backed by £250 million of additional investment.


Current Status: Answered by Clare Haughey on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to its commitment in response to the Equalities and Human Rights Committee report, Hidden Lives: New Beginningsby what date it will publish its anti-destitution strategy.


Answered by Aileen Campbell (08/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5O-03177 on 2 May 2019 which is available on the Parliament’s website. The official report can be viewed at: http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/report.aspx?r=12071&i=109230


Current Status: Answered by Aileen Campbell on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-22272 by Mairi Gougeon on 3 April 2019, what recommendations it has received under phase two of the 2016 Special Protection Area Review to tackle the issues identified in phase one and improve the network for breeding and non-breeding curlew.


Answered by Mairi Gougeon (08/05/2019):

The Third UK Special Protection Area (SPA) Review phase two report highlights that few locations in Scotland will support numbers of breeding curlew near the threshold for biogeographic importance (as provided by the UK SPA Selection Guidelines) and that scoping studies will be required to identify any significant aggregations. We are still considering this review.


Current Status: Answered by Mairi Gougeon on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it decided to set up its recently-established ferry industry advisory group; how the group’s (a) policy remit, (b) role and (c) membership differs from that of the Expert Ferry Group, and what action it is taking to ensure that trade unions will be represented on it.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (08/05/2019):

The decision to change the name of the group from the ‘Expert Ferry Group’ to the ‘Ferry Industry Advisory Group’ was taken in order to better reflect the remit and role of the group.

There is no change to the remit or function of the Group and after consideration it has been decided, for the time being, to continue with the current membership.

The Transport Scotland website will be updated in due course and the membership, terms of reference and minutes of meetings will be published.

The Minister for Energy, Connectivity and the Islands separately meets with the STUC, and all the key unions with an interest in ferry services on a regular basis to discuss a range of relevant matters relating to the ferry services supported by the Scottish Government.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how it plans to meet the investment required to fix aging deer fences that protect some of Scotland's native woodland.


Answered by Fergus Ewing (08/05/2019):

The principal responsibility for fence maintenance and for protecting native woodlands lies with the landowner.

Where the only practicable solution to protecting native woodlands is significant new or replacement fencing, applications for funding can be made to the SRDP Forestry Grant Scheme (FGS).

FGS also supports the costs of deer management through culling to encourage landowners to protect their woodlands without the use of fencing.

Fences on the National Forest Estate, for which Scottish Ministers are responsible, are funded by Forestry and Land Scotland, or jointly with neighbouring landowners if there is shared responsibility for the fence.


Current Status: Answered by Fergus Ewing on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many (a) affordable homes and (b) homes for social rent have been completed in each local authority area in each year since 2007, also broken down by how many have been (i) future-proofed to meet the needs of older people and an ageing population and (ii) adapted or built specifically to meet the accessibility requirements of disabled people, including wheelchair users.


Answered by Kevin Stewart (08/05/2019):

The table showing the number of affordable and social rented homes delivered from April 2007 to December 2018 by local authority area has been placed in SPICe under BIB number 60663. Figures to the end of 2018-19 are in the process of being finalised and are due to be published in June 2019.

The table showing the number of homes specifically designed for older or disabled people from 2008-09 to 2017-18 has been placed in SPICe under BIB number 60663. We do not hold this information in relation to homes completed in 2007-08 and the figures relating to 2018-19 are being finalised and will be published in the Affordable Housing Supply Programme Out-turn report later this year.

The Affordable Housing Supply Programme supports the delivery of flexible housing capable of being adapted to suit peoples’ changing requirements. Therefore wherever possible, all new build units are built to Housing for Varying Need Standards.

The grant subsidy arrangements for the Affordable Housing Supply Programme are also sufficiently flexible to support the development of specialist housing identified by local authorities as a priority, helping disabled people with more complex needs live independently in their own homes and older people to stay in their own homes for longer.

Local authorities are responsible for assessing the housing needs in their areas, and guidance for the setting of Local Housing Strategy targets, including reporting annually on progress, was published on Friday 29 March at https://www.gov.scot/publications/wheelchair-accessible-housing-target-guidance-note-mhdgn-201902/ .

Since the integration of health and social care, Integration Joint Boards are responsible for the planning and delivery of all adaptations.

Funding for adaptations is provided directly to Registered Social Landlords (RSLs) and is additional to the Affordable Housing Supply Programme budget. It is for individual RSLs to determine how to make best use of the adaptations funding received from the Scottish Government. Between 2007-08 and 2017-18 the Scottish government has made £135 million available directly to RSLs to deliver adaptations for their tenants. Final out-turn figures for 2018-19 funding are still being finalised.

Further information relating to this investment is contained within the answer to previous Parliamentary Question S5W-21246 on 1 February 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Kevin Stewart on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it will publish the responses to its consultation on the charity regulation framework.


Answered by Aileen Campbell (08/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-22790 on 7 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Aileen Campbell on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what steps it is taking to address the need for more data to address the reported under-management of native woodland, and whether these can be included in the new Scottish Forestry Strategy 2019-2029's implementation and monitoring framework.


Answered by Fergus Ewing (08/05/2019):

Since 2012 the Native Woodland Survey of Scotland baseline report, and the long running Scottish Natural Heritage’s Site Condition Monitoring on Protected Areas, have provided data to identify native woodlands in unsatisfactory condition and requiring management. Scottish Forestry and SNH are now working with counterparts in other parts of the UK to ensure high quality monitoring data is available for the future.

The Scottish Government’s Forestry Strategy includes a commitment to increase the amount of native woodland condition in good condition, and activities to improve native forests and woodlands. The implementation and monitoring plan will include actions to take forward the Strategy’s commitments and priorities.


Current Status: Answered by Fergus Ewing on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what progress is being made in updating the vessel replacement and deployment plan for the (a) Clyde and Hebrides and (b) Northern Isle ferry fleet, and by what date this will be published.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (08/05/2019):

The Vessel Replacement and Deployment Plan (VRDP) annual report is currently being drafted.

Updated growth forecasts for Clyde and Hebrides routes have been produced, based on 2017 and 2018 carryings.

The report will also take into account the findings now emerging from the Outer Hebrides, Mallaig & Armadale, and Craignure STAGs.

A draft report will be circulated to key stakeholders at the end of May and will be available for discussion at the next meetings of the regional Ferry Stakeholder Groups in June 2019.

We aim to publish the final report by the end of August 2019.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what standard timescales there are for the disclosure of criminal convictions on a Disclosure Scotland PVG certificate and whether any such timescales vary depending upon the nature of the crime committed.


Answered by Maree Todd (08/05/2019):

The length of time that information about a criminal conviction is disclosed on the PVG scheme record is provided for in the Protection of Vulnerable Groups (Scotland) Act 2007 as amended by The Police Act 1997 and Protection of Vulnerable Groups (Scotland) Act 2007 Remedial (No. 2) Order 2015 (“the 2015 Remedial Order”) (Scottish Statutory Instrument 2015 No 423).

Currently, a PVG scheme record will contain information about any unspent conviction recorded about an individual. The position regarding spent convictions (as determined by the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974) is different; the reforms made by the 2015 Remedial Order ended the practice of disclosing all spent convictions the PVG scheme record indefinitely. This means that a conviction for many offences is no longer disclosed on the PVG scheme record once the conviction becomes spent. With regard to convictions for other offences, two lists were created. The effect is that a spent conviction for an offence set out in schedule 8A of the Police Act 1997 (“the 1997 Act”) must be disclosed unless a sheriff orders otherwise, and that a spent conviction for an offence set out in schedule 8B of the 1997 Act is disclosed subject to rules.

The rules are that a spent conviction for an offence on schedule 8B will appear on a higher level disclosure for:

  • 15 years, if 18 or over at the date of conviction;
  • 7 years and 6 months, if under 18 at the date of conviction.

Where a spent conviction for an offence on schedule 8B is present in the PVG scheme record, an individual can apply to have it removed from the higher level disclosure if they think it is not relevant to the purpose for which the disclosure was requested. This application is made to the sheriff, Disclosure Scotland cannot make the decision on removing a conviction.

Where there is a spent conviction for an offence on schedule 8A (which includes serious offences such as rape and other sexual offences, assault to severe injury, and certain terrorism and firearms offences), the law about when an individual is able to make an application to a sheriff is different. Schedule 8A offences must be disclosed for 15 years (or 7 years and 6 months if under 18 on date of conviction) before the individual can apply to the sheriff.

Further details on the process of making an application to a sheriff can be found on Disclosure Scotland’s website at https://www.mygov.scot/convictions-higher-disclosures/ .


Current Status: Answered by Maree Todd on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what discretion there is for Disclosure Scotland in reviewing the length of time that an individual's criminal conviction is required to be disclosed on a PVG certificate based on (a) the nature of the crime committed and (b) whether no further crimes are committed by the person concerned over a set period in future.


Answered by Maree Todd (08/05/2019):

Disclosure Scotland does not have any discretion over the length of time a criminal conviction is disclosed on a PVG scheme record.

In processing an application for a PVG scheme record disclosure, the content is determined by the law as provided for in the Protection of Vulnerable Groups (Scotland) Act 2007 as amended by The Police Act 1997 and Protection of Vulnerable Groups (Scotland) Act 2007 Remedial (No. 2) Order 2015 (Scottish Statutory Instrument 2015 No 423).


Current Status: Answered by Maree Todd on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the answer to question S5W-22404 by Derek Mackay on 18 April 2019, for what reason it will not place the documents in SPICe, and what its position is on whether this decision is consistent with (a) its commitment in the Ministerial Code to act and take "decisions in an open and transparent manner" and the First Minister's comment in the foreword to "lead by example in following the letter and spirit of this Code, and [that she expects] that Ministers and civil servants will do likewise" and (b) the principles set out in its document, Open Government in Scotland Action Plan 2018-2020, which it published in partnership with the Scotland Civil Society Open Government Network.


Answered by Derek Mackay (08/05/2019):

Non-departmental public bodies (NDPBs) are required to operate within the terms of the Scottish Public Finance Manual (SPFM) which sets out specific arrangements for financial control, internal and external and internal audit arrangements and effective risk management procedures. Our NDPBs will prepare, maintain and hold ownership of their contingency risk plans in line with the guidance in the SPFM and their individual framework document. The Scottish Government does not have ownership of these plans and it would be for each individual NDPB, (if asked) to decide whether they would lay their plans in SPICe. It is not for the Scottish Government to lay these plans in SPICe. In overseeing the work of public bodies including our NDPBs, the Scottish Government will always seek to promote and to help create a culture of openness and transparency across the landscape. As part of our Scottish Open Government Action Plan we are committed to working with others to ensure government is transparent, accountable, and responsive.


Current Status: Answered by Derek Mackay on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government when it will provide a progress update regarding the Northern Isles Ferry Services tender.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (08/05/2019):

The Court of Session judgment on 26 April 2019, dismissing Pentland Ferries’ petition for Judicial Review, allows the tender for the Northern Isles Ferry Services to proceed as set out in the competition documents.

I can also confirm that Transport Scotland received tenders from CalMac Ferries Limited and Serco Limited on 29 April 2019. The third prequalifying bidder, the international ferry operating company Förde Reederei Seetouristik GmbH & Co. KG (FRS), decided not to pursue any further interest in the competition. Transport Scotland will evaluate bids received, with a view to having a new public service contract in place by 31 October 2019.

Simultaneously, Transport Scotland will continue its engagement with the European Commission to seek an early resolution to Pentland Ferries’ outstanding State aid complaint about the subsidies payable under the next public services contract.

Further information about Transport Scotland’s engagement with the Commission and any implications for the tender procedure will be announced in due course.


Current Status: Initiated by the Scottish Government. Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 08/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what progress is being made with its programme to provide retraining opportunities for workers in the north east exiting the oil and gas sector, including (a) what the uptake has been and (b) how much it is costing to deliver.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (07/05/2019):

Since its inception, the Transition Training Fund (TTF) has supported more than 4,000 people affected by the global downturn in oil and gas, against an initial target to support a total of at least 3,000 over a period of three years for which funding was made available. It has achieved this through the provision of tailored support to individuals in terms of training courses and grants, and through procured courses to help people improve their skills and find new jobs.

This innovative fund was demand-led, and has surpassed TTF’s initial targets, with high levels of satisfaction recorded among those benefitting from the Fund.

The Fund is currently expected to spend a total of £11,347,000, however SDS are still dealing with a number of live applications in the Fund and this projected total may yet change in line with any variance from projected activity levels.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether the Scottish Prison Service uses mobile detection technology that allows officers to pinpoint mobile phone signals to specific cells.


Answered by Ash Denham (07/05/2019):

I have asked Colin McConnell, Chief Executive of the Scottish Prison Service (SPS), to respond. His response is as follows:

SPS has the capability to deploy mobile detection technology across all prisons to identify the illicit use of personal communication devices.


Current Status: Answered by Ash Denham on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether the IT system for administering the Basic Payments Scheme is functioning to the required standard, and whether a loan scheme will be required to deliver payments for 2019-20.


Answered by Fergus Ewing (07/05/2019):

The Scottish Government’s CAP IT system is functioning effectively and dealing with many thousands of Pillar 1 and Pillar 2 applications and payments each year, demonstrating stability in our processes. The Single Application Form (SAF) application window for 2019 opened on 15 March as planned and the system is performing to a high level of availability for customers. Last year, we saw a 10% increase in the number of customers using the system to submit online applications.

We are on track to deliver 2018 scheme year payments across CAP schemes in line with the payment schedule published in December, including meeting the regulatory target to make Pillar 1 payments by the end of June 2019, as we did last year.

We have used loan schemes over the last few years to guarantee certainty to farmers and crofters over when they will receive their payments. For scheme year 2019 we will keep the situation under review, especially in consideration of the uncertainty caused by EU Exit process.


Current Status: Answered by Fergus Ewing on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government by what date the tendering process for the R100 programme will be complete; when the successful contractors will start work on the project, and how much of the £600 million allocated to the programme has been spent.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (07/05/2019):

The procurement process for R100 is now well underway and I can confirm that we have three highly credible bidders currently engaged in dialogue and we remain on track to award contracts before the end of this year. The procurement process is, however, complex and tightly bound by law and procurement rules. I will of course advise the Scottish Parliament first when we are in a position to award the contract

A sum of £28.2 million has been allocated in the 2019-20 budget to extend high quality, digital connectivity across Scotland. Due to the nature of the contractual terms likely to be deployed, much of the £600 million expenditure associated with delivery of our R100 commitment will not be seen until 2020 and beyond, with payments made on achievement of agreed milestones and payment in arrears of the achievement of milestones. This has also been the case under Scotland’s £400 million Digital Scotland Superfast Broadband programme.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it has completed its feasibility assessment into its proposed publicly-owned energy company and, if not, by what date it will do so.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (07/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-22156 on 27 March 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx The independent's consultants work is ongoing and we expect to discuss their draft report with our local authority partners before the report is finalised over coming weeks.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what discussions it has had with (a) Caledonian MacBrayne and (b) Caledonian Maritime Assets Ltd regarding the mechanical failure of the MV Isle of Lewis at Castlebay ferry terminal, Barra, in April 2019, and what impact this incident has had on (a) sailings, (b) passengers, (c) staff and (d) businesses.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (07/05/2019):

Transport Scotland officials held ongoing discussions with CalMac Ferries Ltd. throughout the period of disruption, when MV Isle of Lewis experienced mechanical breakdown at Castlebay Ferry Terminal 14 April to 18 April 2019, due to a problem encountered with the vessel’s bow thrusters. These discussions included the reason for the mechanical failure, the progress of repairs, resilience measures to ensure lifeline connectivity throughout the Clyde and Hebrides Ferry Service (CHFS) network was maintained, and details of any cancelled, amended or additional sailings.

Discussions between officials and Caledonian Maritime Assets Ltd (CMAL) were not required, as discussions regarding technical issues with vessels fall within the remit of the vessel owners, CMAL, and the operator, CalMac.

The disruption impacted on;

(a) All sailings (1 return sailing each day) of MV Isle of Lewis were cancelled (Castlebay - Oban - Castlebay) on Sunday 14th April until Tuesday 16th April.

On Wednesday the 17th of April, the sailing from Castlebay departed late at 1345 arriving in Oban at 1830; departing Oban at 1900 and arriving in Castlebay at 2345. Normal scheduled service resumed on Thursday 18 April.

(b) Passengers were re-routed on the Mallaig-Lochboisdale service, which provided additional sailings to maintain lifeline connectivity. Additional sailings on the Sound of Barra were also made available to passengers. For Castlebay to Oban over the period 14 April to 17 April inclusive, there were 31 vehicles booked. For Oban to Castlebay there were 72 vehicles booked for the same period. Foot passengers are not required to book, therefore numbers affected are not available.

(c) There was minimal impact on MV Isle of Lewis crew members as they remained on board for the duration of the disruption. The MV Isle of Lewis crew changeover took place on Wednesday 15 April as planned, although slightly later than scheduled at 1830 instead of 1330.

An additional crew was brought in on call back to operate the additional sailings operated on the Sound of Barra route to maintain lifeline connectivity.

(d) CalMac undertook frequent communications with local businesses and hauliers. Commercial traffic was able to travel on the Mallaig-Lochboisdale route and across the Sound of Barra. CalMac informed the local community as soon as the vessel was repaired. On Wednesday 17 April, MV Isle of Lewis sailed to Oban and returned outside of the normal timetable to reduce the effects on businesses as much as possible.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government, further to the evidence given by the Cabinet Secretary for Health and Sport to the Public Petitions Committee on 24 January 2019 regarding petition PE1690 (Official Report, c. 30), what further information it can provide regarding the training module for GPs that is being developed by NHS Education for Scotland, and whether it will take account of the views and experiences of people with lived experience of the condition.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (07/05/2019):

The NES Practice Based Small Group Learning (PBSGL) membership (including GPs, GP nurses, and pharmacists in Scotland) has selected ME as a module for NES to develop and produce in 2020, aligned to the production of the new NICE guideline also due in 2020. It is appropriate to produce this module informed by the NICE guideline to ensure the training module reflects current research findings.

PBSGL modules are designed to meet the learning needs of primary care clinicians. The first step in developing the educational content of the module will be for a small number of primary care clinicians to take part in an online focus group to identify the clinical challenges and learning needs of Scottish primary care. In addition to this, there is often a resource page in the module for use by PBSGL members, which usually contain a range of website sources, including information from charities, third sector organisations and other information clinicians may find useful.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much revenue raised by the business rates incentivisation scheme was retained by each local authority in the (a) 2017-18 and (b) 2018-19 financial years.


Answered by Kate Forbes (07/05/2019):

Following validation of Local Authorities' final audited 2017-18 non-domestic rates income returns the amounts eligible to be retained by individual local authorities under the Business Rates Incentivisation Scheme for 2017-18, will be confirmed shortly and published in a Local Government Finance Circular.

The amounts eligible for retention for 2018-19 will be published following validation of the 2018-19 audited non-domestic rates income returns which are due later in 2019.


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it is considering making changes to charity law and, if so, what proposals are being considered.


Answered by Aileen Campbell (07/05/2019):

The Scottish Government recently consulted on potential improvements to the statutory charity regulation framework, in light of proposals put forward by the Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR) that focus on increasing transparency, accountability and public trust. Responses to the consultation are currently being analysed and have been published on the Scottish Government’s website where the respondents’ permission was granted; this analysis will inform our next steps in due course.

OSCR is a non-ministerial office and part of the Scottish Administration; it is independent of the Scottish Government and reports directly to the Scottish Parliament every year.


Current Status: Answered by Aileen Campbell on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will consider commissioning an independent review of whether the funding that is awarded by the Chief Scientist Office and the Scottish Funding Council for mental and physical health research is allocated on an equitable basis between both fields to help ensure that the highest quality work is carried out.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (07/05/2019):

This answer responds to S5W-22808, S5W-22809, S5W-22810, S5W-22811 and S5W-22812 on 7 May 2019. The Scottish Government Chief Scientist Office (CSO) does not target funding towards any particular condition through its research grant schemes but supports research funding opportunities across a very broad health remit that neither advantages or disadvantages funding towards any particular health area. This allows consideration of research applications to address the widest range of NHS, health and care challenges rather than to focus funding in certain areas and consequently deprioritise others. Applications submitted to CSO are funded following independent expert assessment of the quality of the research projects proposed with funding recommendations made by an independent expert committee.

The Scottish Funding Council (SFC) does not provide funding specifically for physical or mental health research. It is for Universities to decide whether they undertake such research using SFC grants.

All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it considers that mental health research should be treated with the same status as that for physical health and, if so, how it will ensure that the funding allocated by the Chief Scientist Office and the Scottish Funding Council for such research reflects this.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (07/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to S5W-22808 on 7 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its response is to the concerns that have been raised by the mental health charity, Miricyl, that a relatively small share of funding is allocated to mental health research compared with that for physical health.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (07/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to S5W-22808 on 7 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many meetings (a) ministers and (b) officials have had with representatives from Pentland Ferries regarding the application of the road equivalent tariff on ferry services between Gill’s Bay and St Margaret’s Hope.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (07/05/2019):

Between June 2016 and June 2018 there were a total of sixteen meetings between Ministers and/or Transport Scotland officials and Pentland Ferries regarding the potential introduction of reduced ferry fares to Orkney. Ministers participated in four of these meetings, with support from officials.

In addition, there have been a number of related telephone discussions which took place over the same period between Pentland Ferries and Transport Scotland officials.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government for what reasons data relating to the operation of Pentland Ferries services is not available for inclusion in the annual Scottish Transport Statistics.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (07/05/2019):

Pentland Ferries are a wholly private, commercial unlimited company, and as such it is their decision to take on what data is made publically available. However, I am aware that Transport Scotland officials have previously requested such information from Pentland Ferries without success.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what criteria it will use to select an impartial chair of the committee that will review mental health and incapacity legislation.


Answered by Clare Haughey (07/05/2019):

The Scottish Government is clear that we need to ensure we appoint the right person for what will be a complex and important review. As there will be an emphasis on engaging widely, the review will have to get to the heart of differing opinions so that the real issues can be fleshed out and then considered on an evidence-led basis. The Chair therefore will provide strong leadership and will have demonstrated that they are an effective strategist and a good networker. We are also looking for someone who can give a clear sense of direction and who is able to communicate clearly to a wide and varied audience. The Chair will have senior level experience, knowledge and understanding of legislation and/or human rights.

A short-life working group will support the review and will be drawn from areas of interest. We expect to have representatives from legal, psychiatry, social work, nursing and service management backgrounds as well as those with lived experience. It will be for the Chair to determine how they take forward this review but the views of people with lived experience of compulsory care and treatment, their families and representatives must be central to the work of the review.


Current Status: Answered by Clare Haughey on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what most recent assessment it has made of the impact of Abellio ScotRail's performance on the economy, and when it will next carry out another one.


Answered by Michael Matheson (07/05/2019):

The ScotRail Franchise plays a key role towards the economic wellbeing of the Scottish economy. A report which was published in 2016 for Transport Scotland (The Oxera report) estimated that the rail sector’s contribution to Scotland’s economy included:

  • contributes up to £670 million in gross value added per year
  • employs around 12,800 people
  • makes an estimated tax contribution of £292 million per year
  • total user benefits of up to £1 billion per year

A follow up assessment on the impact of the rail network on the Scottish economy has not yet been scheduled.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on introducing official road signage to warn road users of the presence of red squirrels.


Answered by Michael Matheson (07/05/2019):

The Scottish Government has approved official road signs warning road users of the presence of red squirrels for a number of locations across Scotland in the past and will approve similar applications at other locations that are considered appropriate.

Consideration will also be given to incorporating these signs into a future amendment of the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions, removing the need for authorisation.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its response is to the statement in the Fraser of Allander Institute blog, Budget 2019-20: what next?, that “Local government was...a key tension within the budget. In the context of budget negotiations, such discussions tend to centre upon the level of funding provided to councils and whether or not the settlement is fair.”


Answered by Kate Forbes (07/05/2019):

The Scottish Government routinely engages with political parties across the Scottish Parliament as part of the Scottish Budget agreement process.

The 2019-20 Scottish Budget protects and invests in Scotland's public services, offering stability in the face of the chaos and confusion of the UK imposed Brexit.

Local Government funding represents a significant proportion of the Scottish Budget. In 2019-20, Scottish Ministers are providing councils with a real terms funding increase of £310 million or 2.9 per cent. The real terms increase in funding alongside the package of local tax reform measures, that will provide the most significant empowerment of local authorities since devolution, are evidence that the Scottish Government will continue to treat local government fairly.


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what progress has been made in exploring options for the provision of free bedside entertainment for hospital patients.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (07/05/2019):

The Scottish Government expects all NHS boards to assess and adopt a patient-centred approach on the expiration of the contracts, with consideration given to both value for money and, importantly, the patient experience.

We are currently working with NHS Directors of Estates to establish feasibility of free bedside entertainment across NHSScotland. For example, NHS Lothian have now implemented free patient Wi-Fi services, including access to video streaming, in two of their acute sites. It is expected that other NHS Boards consider provision of free patient Wi-Fi and other suitable alternatives to the current Hospedia services when assessing patient entertainment services.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on increasing the funding that is awarded by the Chief Scientist Office and the Scottish Funding Council for mental health research.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (07/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to S5W-22808 on 7 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its response is to reported concerns that funding for cardiovascular research does not adequately reflect the impact that cardiovascular disease has on the population and the economy.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (07/05/2019):

I refer the member to the answer to S5W-22808 on 7 May 2019. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament's website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx .


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how many bus shelters in each local authority are liable for non-domestic rates, also broken down by how much was raised from these in 2018-19.


Answered by Kate Forbes (07/05/2019):

The following table shows the number of entries of bus shelters on the valuation roll and the amount of non-domestic rates income raised in 2018-19 broken down by local authority. Where multiple bus shelters have the same rateable occupier, such as a council, they may be entered as a composite entry.

 

Local Authority

Number of Bus Shelter Entries

Total NDR Income (£s)

Aberdeen City

2

22156

Aberdeenshire

1

22562

Angus

1

14880

Argyll & Bute

1

15960

Clackmannanshire

1

8736

Dumfries & Galloway

3

25776

Dundee City

1

40176

East Ayrshire

1

17760

East Dunbartonshire

1

10320

East Lothian

1

14256

East Renfrewshire

1

12480

Edinburgh City

1

56798

Eilean Siar

1

6240

Falkirk

2

31161

Fife

1

59708

Glasgow City

2

40562

Highlands

10

30432

Inverclyde

1

12480

Midlothian

1

14688

Moray

1

12840

North Ayrshire

1

18480

North Lanarkshire

5

25032

Orkney Islands

1

2520

Perth & Kinross

2

20112

Renfrewshire

1

11040

Scottish Borders

1

16992

Shetland Islands

2

14040

South Ayrshire

1

12240

South Lanarkshire

3

113723

Stirling

1

14880

West Dunbartonshire

1

12960

West Lothian

1

32434

This data is taken from the Valuation Roll, and Local Authority Billing information, as at June 2018.


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government under what circumstances it considers that a bus shelter can constitute part of a business’s premises, and what its position is on whether such shelters should continue to be liable for non-domestic rates.


Answered by Kate Forbes (07/05/2019):

Non-domestic rates are levied on all ‘Land and Heritages’ and the valuation of those lands and heritages is a matter for Scottish assessors who are wholly independent of central and local government. Scottish Assessors follow applicable statute and case law in making their decisions on non-domestic property valuations. The Scottish Government has no locus to intervene in that process. Bus shelters are rateable and are therefore liable for non-domestic rates. Where multiple bus shelters have the same rateable occupier, such as a council, they may be entered as a composite entry.


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action it takes to encourage local authorities to install new bus shelters.


Answered by Michael Matheson (07/05/2019):

Provision of bus stops and shelters is the responsibility of local authorities. The Scottish Government has ongoing engagement with local authorities and other stakeholders about how to improve bus provision in partnership. The Transport (Scotland) Bill provides local authorities with a framework of new tools to address bus provision in their area.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government which local authorities have offered an energy efficiency discount in each year since 2016.


Answered by Kate Forbes (07/05/2019):

This information is not held centrally. Although the Scottish Government tables an annual report to Parliament on the operation of the energy efficiency discount schemes as required by section 66 of the Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009, the obligation to establish these schemes rests with individual local authorities, as set out in Section 65 of the same Act.


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what progress each sector is making in meeting the target set out in its document, Conserve and Save: The Energy Efficiency Action Plan for Scotland, for a 12% reduction in final energy consumption by 2020.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (07/05/2019):

This information is in the public domain and can be found at: https://www2.gov.scot/Resource/0054/00547120.xlsx in the ‘Energy consump by sector’ tab.

The most recent data broken down by sector (2016) shows that industrial and commercial consumption (of electricity and heat) has decreased the most of all sectors, 22.7% lower than the 2005-07 baseline. Domestic consumption has dropped by 20.1% and energy consumption in transport has dropped by 2.7%. Overall, in 2016, total final energy consumption was 15.0% lower than the baseline.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on encouraging local authorities to ring-fence funding received from bus shelters that are liable for non-domestic rates toward building new shelters that will not be eligible for such charges.


Answered by Kate Forbes (07/05/2019):

Non-domestic rates are levied on all ‘Land and Heritages’ and the valuation of those lands and heritages is a matter for Scottish assessors who are wholly independent of central and local government. Bus shelters are rateable and are therefore liable for non-domestic rates.

Non-domestic rates are administered and collected by local authorities who retain all of the non-domestic rates revenue they raise. Councils are democratically elected independent bodies, that are accountable to their local electorate and it is for councils to determine how they prioritise their resources, including the income generated through non-domestic rates in their area. Under the Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015, each local Council has wide-ranging powers to create bespoke rates reliefs to address their own local circumstances.


Current Status: Answered by Kate Forbes on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what action it is taking to encourage the use of smart ticketing across public transport, and what progress is being made with this.


Answered by Michael Matheson (07/05/2019):

Transport Scotland, on behalf of the Scottish Government, is undertaking a portfolio of projects to enhance Scotland’s smart services and deliver on the vision that ‘all journeys on Scotland’s public transport network can be made using some form of smart ticketing or payment’.

There has been significant progress on smart ticketing - rail, subway, tram and 99% of bus operators are now smart enabled. Annually over half a billion journeys are made on Scotland’s public transport network, and over a third of these journeys are now made using smart ticketing or payment technology. Current projects include work to expand the successful Dundee ABC smart integrated bus to bus ticketing scheme to include North East Fife; working with transport operators, public bodies and local authorities to enhance smartcard interoperability across all modes; and delivery of a £1.1m Smart Pay Grant Fund to support bus operators with improving their equipment to accept contactless payment.

Marketing projects undertaken in partnership with transport operators, local authorities, Young Scot and Regional Transport Partnerships also aim to promote smart ticketing services to the public, such as the joint Stagecoach, ScotRail and Transport Scotland ‘Fife in the Fast Lane’ campaign last winter to mark the reopening of the Forth Road Bridge as a public transport corridor, as well as supporting ScotRail and Young Scot with their own recent smartcard marketing activity.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will make a statement on the (a) composition and (b) remit of its recently-established ferry industry advisory board.


Answered by Paul Wheelhouse (07/05/2019):

The decision to change the name of the group from the ‘Expert Ferry Group’ to the ‘Ferry Industry Advisory Group’ was taken in order to better reflect the remit and role of the group.

There is no change to the remit or function of the Group, as such, and after consideration it has been decided, for the time being, to continue with the current membership. However, it is Ministers intention to proactively engage the Group in providing advice on a number of key ferries issues of importance to Scottish Ministers and stakeholders.

The Transport Scotland website will be updated in due course and the membership, terms of reference and minutes of meetings will be published.


Current Status: Answered by Paul Wheelhouse on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what recent meetings it has had with (a) SPT and (b) the ScotRail Alliance regarding the use of smart ticketing.


Answered by Michael Matheson (07/05/2019):

The Scottish Government's National Transport Agency, Transport Scotland, has regular meetings with SPT and Abellio ScotRail regarding the use of smart ticketing.

Transport Scotland officials are working with SPT and Abellio ScotRail to deliver smartcard interoperability between bus, rail and subway, with weekly technical meetings in place to oversee this. In addition more strategic meetings have been held with SPT (February 2019) to ascertain areas of potential collaboration to improve smart ticketing services, and the last meeting with Abellio ScotRail was held this month to discuss ScotRail's smart ticketing Programme.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government how much has been spent on (a) drugs and (b) other treatments for blood cancer in each year since 2015.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (07/05/2019):

This information is not collected or held centrally to the level of detail requested. It is for NHS Boards to determine spend on drugs and other blood cancer treatment services from their unified budget in accordance with the needs of their resident population and based on clinical decisions. This will vary from Board to Board and Region to Region.

Treatment, particularly for cancer, can be complex and often involves the use of a combination of medicines. Many of the drugs can be used for treatment of other cancer and non-cancer conditions, which makes it difficult to calculate the cost of drugs for specific treatments such as blood cancer.


Current Status: Answered by Jeane Freeman on 07/05/2019

To ask the Scottish Government what assistance it has provided to NHS Dumfries and Galloway to help recruit GPs across the region.


Answered by Jeane Freeman (07/05/2019):