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60 Minutes, The Mesh Scandal

As an amendment to motion S5M-12280 in the name of Neil Findlay (60 Minutes, The Mesh Scandal), leave out from "the Cabinet Secretary" to end and insert "all NHS boards should end the use of mesh entirely with immediate effect."

Supported by: Angus MacDonald, Ivan McKee, Joan McAlpine, Sandra White, Clare Haughey, Alex Neil


60 Minutes, The Mesh Scandal

That the Parliament understands that the respected American news programme, 60 Minutes, recently broadcast an episode dealing with the issue of transvaginal mesh implants; believes that the programme stated that the use of polypropylene transvaginal mesh is unsuitable for medical use, leading to chronic pain, difficulty with movement, infection and severe bleeding, among other conditions; understands that the manufacturer of one type of mesh, Boston Scientific, is now facing 48,000 lawsuits in the United States; further understands that serious allegations have been made yet again regarding the knowing use of counterfeit mesh, which appears to erode and disperses in the body after just a few months; believes that hundreds of women were implanted with mesh products in Scotland following the call for it to be suspended in 2014; notes that the issue of counterfeit mesh was raised in the Parliament in September 2016 and considers that the Cabinet Secretary for Health and Sport, MHRA and Police Scotland showed little interest in the evidence presented, and reinforces the call for mesh to be cleared from the shelves across the NHS in Scotland.

Supported by: Pauline McNeill, Elaine Smith, Iain Gray, Liz Smith, Monica Lennon, Alexander Stewart, Margaret Mitchell, Annie Wells, Donald Cameron, Anas Sarwar, Jeremy Balfour, Mark Ruskell, Murdo Fraser, Alex Rowley, Daniel Johnson, Jackson Carlaw, Alison Harris, Kezia Dugdale, Liam McArthur, Finlay Carson, John Scott


To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on the impact on a person's life of mesh injuries as a result of treatment for stress urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse or hernia, and whether it will support the UK Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Health by writing to the Department for Work and Pensions on this issue.


Answered by Shona Robison (10/05/2018):

I shall reply to the member as soon as possible.

 


Current Status: Holding Answer issued by Shona Robison on 10/05/2018

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency not issuing a medical device alert or publishing information for patients reflecting concerns regarding mesh implants, whether it will write to all women who have an implant to provide the most up-to-date information, including a list of possible complication symptoms and who to contact if these occur.


Answered by Shona Robison (10/05/2018):

I shall reply to the member as soon as possible.

 


Current Status: Holding Answer issued by Shona Robison on 10/05/2018
NHS England Mesh Audit

That the Parliament welcomes the announcement from NHS England of a review of all mesh operations in England from 2005; thanks the All Party Group in Westminster for its work in pushing for a full analysis of the mesh complication rate; considers that the Scottish Government has systematically failed mesh victims through its inaction in the face of mounting evidence of significant complication rates; thanks Alex Neil MSP for his willingness as Cabinet Secretary for Health and Sport to stand up for mesh victims, including Eastwood resident, Elaine Holmes; believes that the Scottish Government must review its advice on the use of mesh, in light of the NHS England audit, and pays tribute to the Scottish Mesh Survivors, including Elaine Holmes and Olive McIroy, for becoming the public face of this campaign and their support for men and women suffering from mesh complications.

Supported by: Tom Mason, Jeremy Balfour, Alexander Stewart, Peter Chapman, Miles Briggs, Rachael Hamilton, Margaret Mitchell, Alison Harris, Bill Bowman, Liz Smith, Donald Cameron, Liam Kerr, Jamie Greene, Maurice Corry, Dean Lockhart, Alexander Burnett, Brian Whittle, Neil Findlay, John Scott


Current Status: Fallen on 09/05/2018

To ask the Scottish Government whether it will provide details of all involvement by former or current special advisers in providing advice to (a) ministers and (b) officials on the use of transvaginal mesh implants.


Answered by Aileen Campbell (09/01/2018):

In order to provide effective assistance to Ministers, special advisers work closely with the Ministerial team and with civil servants and may give assistance and advice on any aspect of Scottish Government business. Medical advice in relation to mesh is provided to both Ministers and officials by appropriately qualified and experienced clinical personnel.


Current Status: Answered by Aileen Campbell on 09/01/2018

To ask the Scottish Government what steps it plans to take to verify and improve advice given to ministers on health issues, including external supervision, in light of the reported comments by the former Cabinet Secretary for Health and Wellbeing, Alex Neil MSP, that he came to doubt advice given to him by officials on transvaginal mesh implant issues and "ended up doing a lot of research into the subject" himself.


Answered by Joe FitzPatrick (19/01/2018):

Civil servants abide by the Civil Service Code, which expects them to act with integrity, honesty, objectivity and impartiality. In particular, civil servants are asked to set out relevant issues truthfully, and must not mislead Ministers or be influenced by improper pressures. Civil servants must provide information and advice on the basis of evidence, and accurately present opinions and facts.

The Civil Service Code can be viewed here: https://beta.gov.scot/publications/civil-service-code/

Any Minister who has concerns about advice given by Scottish Government officials should raise the issue with the relevant senior official at the time the advice is offered.


Current Status: Answered by Joe FitzPatrick on 19/01/2018
New Zealand Becomes First Country to Ban Vaginal Mesh

That the Parliament welcomes reports that New Zealand has become the first country to effectively ban vaginal mesh implants; understands that its Ministry of Health sought to regulate their use after coming to the conclusion that the risks of using mesh in the pelvis for prolapse and stress incontinence far outweigh any benefits; understands that many doctors and patients have branded the Scottish Government’s review into the use of mesh a "white wash", and believes that Scotland should follow the example set by New Zealand by seeking a full effective ban on mesh products for this purpose immediately.

Supported by: Monica Lennon, Jackie Baillie


Current Status: Fallen on 13/03/2018

To ask the Scottish Government what action it will take following the debate on 5 December 2017 on polypropylene mesh medical devices.


Answered by Shona Robison (14/12/2017):

Following the debate in the chamber last week, and in light of the BBC’s Panorama programme earlier this week, both the Chief Medical Officer and I have written to the MHRA to express concerns about the role of the MHRA in relation to transvaginal mesh. Furthermore, given the concerns, I have also written to the Secretary of State for Health, Jeremy Hunt given his overall responsibility for the MHRA asking for a meeting to discuss these concerns.

In her letter, the Chief Medical Officer also raised the recent decision about the future use of mesh in Australia and is seeking some clarification on what evidence informed the Australian decision and confirmation that it is being considered by the Regulator.

Healthcare Improvement Scotland continue to progress plans for the first two meetings of the mesh Oversight Group and, in addition, Scottish Government officials continue to liaise with other UK nations about the options for a mesh registry.

Members will be aware that NICE undertook a public consultation on revised mesh guidance, and we expect that guidance to be published tomorrow. NICE IPP guidance applies across the UK, including in Scotland, and the Chief Medical Officer has therefore written to all Health Boards, alerting them to the fact that new guidance will shortly be published, and stressing that it must be implemented.

As ever, the Scottish Government's overriding concern is quality of care and, until the Chief Medical Officer is satisfied that the Review's recommendations have been implemented, and all necessary procedures, approvals and restrictions are in place, the request that routine use of mesh be suspended will continue.


Current Status: Answered by Shona Robison on 14/12/2017
Business Motion

That the Parliament agrees

(a) the following programme of business—

Tuesday 5 December 2017

2.00 pm Time for Reflection

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

followed by Topical Questions (if selected)

followed by Ministerial Statement: Planning and Inclusive Growth

followed by Public Petitions Committee Debate: PE1517 on Polypropylene Mesh Medical Devices

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

followed by Members’ Business

Wednesday 6 December 2017

2.00 pm Parliamentary Bureau Motions

2.00 pm Portfolio Questions

Communities, Social Security and Equalities

 

followed by Scottish Liberal Democrat Party Business

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

followed by Members’ Business

Thursday 7 December 2017

11.40 am Parliamentary Bureau Motions

11.40 am General Questions

12.00 pm First Minister's Questions

followed by Members’ Business

2.30 pm Parliamentary Bureau Motions

2.30 pm Ministerial Statement: Improving Scotland's Air Quality - Putting in Place Scotland's Low Emission Zones

followed by Scottish Government Debate: Sea Fisheries and End Year Negotiations

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

Tuesday 12 December 2017

2.00 pm Time for Reflection

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

followed by Topical Questions (if selected)

followed by Scottish Government Business

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

followed by Members’ Business

Wednesday 13 December 2017

2.00 pm Parliamentary Bureau Motions

2.00 pm Portfolio Questions

Finance and Constitution;

Economy, Jobs and Fair Work

 

followed by Scottish Government Business

 

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

followed by Members’ Business

Thursday 14 December 2017

11.40 am Parliamentary Bureau Motions

11.40 am General Questions

12.00 pm First Minister's Questions

followed by Members’ Business

2.30 pm Parliamentary Bureau Motions

2.30 pm Scottish Government Business

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

and (b) that, in relation to First Minister’s Questions on 7 December, in rule 13.6.2, insert at end “and may provide an opportunity for Party Leaders or their representatives to question the First Minister”.


Current Status: Taken in the Chamber on 29/11/2017