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New Zealand Becomes First Country to Ban Vaginal Mesh

That the Parliament welcomes reports that New Zealand has become the first country to effectively ban vaginal mesh implants; understands that its Ministry of Health sought to regulate their use after coming to the conclusion that the risks of using mesh in the pelvis for prolapse and stress incontinence far outweigh any benefits; understands that many doctors and patients have branded the Scottish Government’s review into the use of mesh a "white wash", and believes that Scotland should follow the example set by New Zealand by seeking a full effective ban on mesh products for this purpose immediately.

Supported by: Monica Lennon


To ask the Scottish Government what action it will take following the debate on 5 December 2017 on polypropylene mesh medical devices.


Answered by Shona Robison (14/12/2017):

Following the debate in the chamber last week, and in light of the BBC’s Panorama programme earlier this week, both the Chief Medical Officer and I have written to the MHRA to express concerns about the role of the MHRA in relation to transvaginal mesh. Furthermore, given the concerns, I have also written to the Secretary of State for Health, Jeremy Hunt given his overall responsibility for the MHRA asking for a meeting to discuss these concerns.

In her letter, the Chief Medical Officer also raised the recent decision about the future use of mesh in Australia and is seeking some clarification on what evidence informed the Australian decision and confirmation that it is being considered by the Regulator.

Healthcare Improvement Scotland continue to progress plans for the first two meetings of the mesh Oversight Group and, in addition, Scottish Government officials continue to liaise with other UK nations about the options for a mesh registry.

Members will be aware that NICE undertook a public consultation on revised mesh guidance, and we expect that guidance to be published tomorrow. NICE IPP guidance applies across the UK, including in Scotland, and the Chief Medical Officer has therefore written to all Health Boards, alerting them to the fact that new guidance will shortly be published, and stressing that it must be implemented.

As ever, the Scottish Government's overriding concern is quality of care and, until the Chief Medical Officer is satisfied that the Review's recommendations have been implemented, and all necessary procedures, approvals and restrictions are in place, the request that routine use of mesh be suspended will continue.


Current Status: Answered by Shona Robison on 14/12/2017
Business Motion

That the Parliament agrees

(a) the following programme of business—

Tuesday 5 December 2017

2.00 pm Time for Reflection

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

followed by Topical Questions (if selected)

followed by Ministerial Statement: Planning and Inclusive Growth

followed by Public Petitions Committee Debate: PE1517 on Polypropylene Mesh Medical Devices

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

followed by Members’ Business

Wednesday 6 December 2017

2.00 pm Parliamentary Bureau Motions

2.00 pm Portfolio Questions

Communities, Social Security and Equalities

 

followed by Scottish Liberal Democrat Party Business

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

followed by Members’ Business

Thursday 7 December 2017

11.40 am Parliamentary Bureau Motions

11.40 am General Questions

12.00 pm First Minister's Questions

followed by Members’ Business

2.30 pm Parliamentary Bureau Motions

2.30 pm Ministerial Statement: Improving Scotland's Air Quality - Putting in Place Scotland's Low Emission Zones

followed by Scottish Government Debate: Sea Fisheries and End Year Negotiations

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

Tuesday 12 December 2017

2.00 pm Time for Reflection

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

followed by Topical Questions (if selected)

followed by Scottish Government Business

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

followed by Members’ Business

Wednesday 13 December 2017

2.00 pm Parliamentary Bureau Motions

2.00 pm Portfolio Questions

Finance and Constitution;

Economy, Jobs and Fair Work

 

followed by Scottish Government Business

 

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

followed by Members’ Business

Thursday 14 December 2017

11.40 am Parliamentary Bureau Motions

11.40 am General Questions

12.00 pm First Minister's Questions

followed by Members’ Business

2.30 pm Parliamentary Bureau Motions

2.30 pm Scottish Government Business

followed by Business Motions

followed by Parliamentary Bureau Motions

5.00 pm Decision Time

and (b) that, in relation to First Minister’s Questions on 7 December, in rule 13.6.2, insert at end “and may provide an opportunity for Party Leaders or their representatives to question the First Minister”.


Current Status: Taken in the Chamber on 29/11/2017

To ask the Scottish Government what plans the Cabinet Secretary for Health and Sport has to meet the (a) chief medical officer and (b) Secretary of State for Health to discuss the announcement by the National Institute for Care and Excellence (NICE) to stop routine trans-vaginal mesh implants in England, and whether the cabinet secretary also plans to discuss this matter with representatives of NICE.


Answered by Shona Robison (13/12/2017):

I shall reply to the member as soon as possible.


Current Status: Holding Answer issued by Shona Robison on 13/12/2017
PE1517 Polypropylene Mesh Medical Devices

That the Parliament notes public petition PE1517 on polypropylene mesh medical devices.

Supported by: Angus MacDonald


Current Status: Taken in the Chamber on 05/12/2017

To ask the Scottish Government what (a) landing quotas there are and (b) net size regulations and monitoring is in place for the fishing of squid.


Answered by Fergus Ewing (05/12/2017):

(a) Squid are not regulated under the EU Total Allowable Catch (TAC) system and there are no quota limits set for this species.

(b) Net sizes are specified in EC Regulation 850/98, known as the Technical Conservation measures, net (or mesh) sizes for the squid fishery range upwards from 32mm depending on the minimum percentage of target species for the individual vessel. The majority of vessels targeting squid will likely be using
32-54mm mesh.

The requirements for monitoring and sanctions for infringements are laid down in the EU Control Regulation (EC) No 1224/2009. Monitoring activities on fisheries that take demersal species include the use of vessel monitoring systems (VMS) on board vessels over 12 m overall length; direct observation by patrol vessels and aerial patrols; inspection of vessels, gear, catches at sea and on shore, and verification of EU logbook data (electronic and paper) against sales documents. All related surveillance activity and physical inspections are carried out on risk based analysis.


Current Status: Answered by Fergus Ewing on 05/12/2017
Mesh Implants in Men

That the Parliament understands that, in addition to the many women who have experienced complications as a result of mesh implants, there are a significant number of men in Scotland, including in the Caithness, Sutherland and Ross constituency, who are also in pain as a result of the use mesh technology, believes that, although the independent review of transvaginal mesh implants gave many women support and in some cases justice, there is little support available for the men, and notes the call to carry out a similar independent review into the procedures that have been carried out on men.

Supported by: Clare Haughey, Richard Lyle, Gillian Martin, Fulton MacGregor, Jenny Gilruth, Neil Findlay, Ivan McKee, John Mason, Jackie Baillie


Current Status: Eligible for Members’ Business, Pending Cross Party Support

To ask the Scottish Government how many men have experienced complications as a result of hernia repairs using mesh implants in each of the last five years.


Answered by Shona Robison (29/11/2017):

This information is not held centrally by the Scottish Government, however Information Services Division publish details of all Inpatient and Day case Surgical Procedures and Operations, including 'Inguinal hernia procedures' and 'Other hernia repair', which can be accessed here:

http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/Hospital-Care/Operations-and-Procedures/

There is however no specific procedure code for hernia repairs using mesh, and ‘complications’ have not been defined and there are a number of comorbidities associated with hernias, which means identifying complications is not possible.


Current Status: Answered by Shona Robison on 29/11/2017
Incontinence in Scotland

That the Parliament understands that incontinence has the potential to affect everyone at some point and that the condition can arise as a symptom of a range of varied medical conditions, such as obesity, traumatic childbirth and muscle weakness; believes that 20% of women between 17 and 30 will experience so-called giggle incontinence, which has the potential to lead to greater complications in later life, in particular the need for surgical interventions, including transvaginal mesh implants; understands that the only country to have calculated the costs associated with this is Australia, which estimates these to be around $43 billion (£25 billion) per year as they go beyond the provision of sanitary wear, medication and surgery, and include the cost of dealing with the depression and anxiety that can arise; recognises what it sees as the importance of physiotherapy in alleviating the symptoms, and notes that, when provided early, this has reportedly proved effective in 80% of cases; understands that there is no formal training around basic incontinence prevention in Scotland for the midwifery, health visitor or physiotherapist workforce; acknowledges the taboo around the subject, which, it believes, suppresses an open discussion about it and often prevents people experiencing the condition from seeking help, and notes the view that the case for a national incontinence strategy is compelling, as it would be important to improving the life quality of hundreds of thousands of people in Edinburgh and across the country and would be of benefit to the public purse.

Supported by: Monica Lennon, Jeremy Balfour, Liam Kerr, Edward Mountain, Rachael Hamilton, Tom Arthur, Jackie Baillie, Neil Findlay, Alexander Burnett, Alison Johnstone, Colin Smyth, Stewart Stevenson


Current Status: Taken in the Chamber on 16/11/2017
BBC's Victoria Derbyshire Programme

That the Parliament congratulates the BBC's Victoria Derbyshire programme on its work exposing the medical problems and life-changing injuries and pain that can be caused by surgical mesh; notes that the programme featured Scottish women who experienced such injuries and pain from transvaginal mesh and male and female hernia patients who have severe pain and complications following the use of mesh for their conditions, and calls on the Scottish Government to conduct a review of the use of mesh in hernia operations in Scotland.

Supported by: David Stewart, Jeremy Balfour, Alexander Burnett, Alison Johnstone, Iain Gray, Alex Neil, Gordon Lindhurst, Jackie Baillie, Alex Cole-Hamilton, Alex Rowley, Brian Whittle, Jackson Carlaw


Current Status: Fallen on 29/11/2017