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To ask the Scottish Executive how many babies have (a) developed life threatening Group B streptococcal infections, (b) died due to Group B streptococcal infections and (c) survived but have been left with serious long-term mental or physical problems due to Group B streptococcal infections, in each of the last 10 years for which records are available.

Answered by Malcolm Chisholm (02/03/2004): The available information on neonatal discharges recording Group B streptococcal infections is shown in the table for years 1996 to 2003.

Discharges from Neonatal Units with Diagnoses of Group B Streptococcal (ICD10 P360) between April 1996 and March 2003:

 

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03*

No of Discharges

149

236

266

224

207

256

153

Source: SMR11

Note: *Incomplete data collection

The number of deaths of children aged under 2, with a mention of Group B Streptococcus infection on the death certificate, between 1996 and 2003 is as follows:

 

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003 2

Mention of Group B Streptococcus

Infection

3

2

6

3

5

5

4

2

 - of which

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

underlying cause of death involved Group B Streptococcus infection1

1

1

4

2

4

4

2

2

Source: General Register Office for Scotland

Notes:

1. Causes associated with Group B Streptococcus included meningitis, pneumonia, and septicaemia.

2. Data for 2003 are provisional.

Information on babies surviving but left with serious long term mental or physical problems due to Group B streptococcal infections is not readily available.


Current Status: Answered by Malcolm Chisholm on 02/03/2004