Motions, Questions and Answers Search

 

Motions, Questions and Answers Search Help

UniqueIdEventIdEventTypeIdEventTypeEventSubTypeIdEventSubTypeMSPIdMSPNamePartyNameConstituencyRegionTitleItemTextFormattedAnswerTextFormattedAnswerDateAnswerStatusIdExpectedAnswerDateHoldingAnswerQuestionToIdQuestionToAnsweredByMspApprovedDateSubmissionDateMeetingDateProductionStatusIdRecordStatusIdStatusDateOnBehalfOfConsideredForMembersBusinessCrossPartySupportRegisteredInterestSupportCountSupportDateIsEventLinkCurrentMinister

To ask the Scottish Government how many Syrian refugees to the UK have been settled in Scotland.


Answered by Angela Constance (21/11/2017):

Scotland has welcomed over 1,900 people under the UK Government's Syrian Resettlement Programme since October 2015.

Official statistics for the Syrian Resettlement programme are published quarterly by the Home Office. The latest set of statistics was published on 24 August 2017 and covered the period to 30 June 2017. Those statistics show that 1,807 Syrian refugees arrived in Scotland under the Programme up to 30 June 2017.


Current Status: Answered by Angela Constance on 21/11/2017

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of recent reports from Barnardo’s, Victim Support, Liberty and Rape Crisis, which state that the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) has not compensated nearly 700 child victims of sexual abuse, what its position is on the impact on victims in Scotland, and what action it can take to review CICA's guidelines for Scotland.


Answered by Michael Matheson (10/08/2017):

Compensation for victims of crime in Scotland is provided through the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) in accordance with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme (CICS), which is set by the UK Government and approved by the UK Parliament. There are no separate CICS guidelines for Scotland.

CICA and the UK Government are aware of the concerns raised by these charities. CICA are reviewing their guidelines to ensure they are robust enough to deal with cases of child sexual abuse, where grooming may be a factor.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 10/08/2017

To ask the Scottish Government, in light of the impact on victims in Scotland, what action it can take with the UK Government to review the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority guidelines regarding compensation for victims of sexual abuse under the age of 16.


Answered by Michael Matheson (10/08/2017):

I refer the member to the answer to question S5W-10427 on 10 August 2017. All answers to written parliamentary questions are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/28877.aspx


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 10/08/2017

To ask the Scottish Government what its position is on someone under the age of 16 being able to give consent to sexual activity.


Answered by Michael Matheson (10/08/2017):

There are a range of criminal offences relating to sexual activity with a child under the age of 16. These are contained in the Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2009 ("the 2009 Act"). The offences contained within this legislation are based on a Scottish Law Commission report into sexual offences with the offences acknowledging and informed by the generally accepted understanding that a child's capacity to consent to sexual activity differs depending on their specific age.

Under the 2009 Act, children under the age of 13 are deemed to have no capacity to consent to sexual activity. Under section 18 of the 2009 Act, it is an offence of rape of a young child where an adult undertakes sexual activity with a child under the age of 13.

Under the 2009 Act, children aged between 13 and 15 are deemed to have only limited capacity to consent to sexual activity. So, for example, where an adult has non-consensual sexual intercourse with a 13-15 year old child, this can be prosecuted as rape under section 1 of the 2009 Act. Where it cannot be proven that the child did not consent, this is still an offence which can be prosecuted using the offence of 'sexual intercourse with an older child' under section 28 of the 2009 Act.

As can be seen, the 2009 Act provides that it is always a criminal offence for an adult to knowingly engage in sexual activity with a child under the age of 16.


Current Status: Answered by Michael Matheson on 10/08/2017